Question - Are California lilacs Evergreen?

Answered by: Gary Cooper  |  Category: General  |  Last Updated: 24-08-2021  |  Views: 1187  |  Total Questions: 14

California Lilac Information Plants are evergreen and have small to medium glossy green leaves which accent the bright to light blue flowers. You can see California lilac growing wild in Oregon, California and Washington, and some species are found as far as Guatemala. Selecting Lilacs They come in deciduous and evergreen forms, while Syringa lilacs are deciduous. Although many California lilacs grow to only about 3 feet in height, the taller varieties make attractive flowering or evergreen privacy hedges. Not all may grow in your garden and many from Southern California may grow just fine as well. California Lilacs, or Ceanothus, are some of our most fragrant and colorful shrubs here in California. They are also evergreen and very drought tolerant. Other ceanothus to look out for are 'Puget Blue', a medium-sized, free-flowering shrub that is recommended for clay soil; 'Cascade', which has long tumbling flower clusters; the dark-blue 'Burkwoodii', a later-flowering variety; and 'Delight', which is hardier than most.

http://www.kilcoynelilacfarm.com/care.html

Lilacs are deciduous (they lose their leaves in the winter) and to facilitate their dormancy, we start reducing their water intake in September and by Halloween we have altogether stopped watering. Around Halloween or thereafter, we usually receive our first frost and the lilacs drop their leaves for winter.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/shrubs/lilac/is-lilac-a-tree-or-a-shrub.htm

Shrub lilacs and bush lilacs are short and compact. Tree lilacs can grow up to 25 feet (7. 6 m. ) high and have a tree-like appearance, but their many stems tend to get them classified as bushes. They are not technically trees, but they get big enough that you can treat them as if they are.

https://home.howstuffworks.com/define-lilac.htm

Lilac. Lilacs are extremely cold resistant, and have what it takes to come through some very tough winters unharmed and gladden many hearts in spring. They are tall, upright shrubs laden with broad pointed clusters of highly perfumed, lavender flowers and green, heart-shaped leaves.

https://www.difference.wiki/lavender-vs-lilac/

Lilac is the light purple color with a pinkish hue, whereas Lavender is the light purple color with a bluish hue. The flowers of these colors have the similar name as of their shade, so when one refers to Lavender and Lilac it can either be about color or the flowers.

https://www.hometalk.com/29565587/q-is-there-a-difference-of-a-lilac-bush-from-a-lilac-tree

Shrub Lilacs and bush lilacs are short and compact. Tree lilacs are trickier. The classic definition of a tree is that it is over 13 feet tall and has a single trunk. Tree lilacs can grow up to 25 feet high and have a tree-like appearance, but their many stems tend to get them classified as bushes.

https://www.hgtv.com/outdoors/landscaping-and-hardscaping/how-to-plant-and-care-for-lilacs

Here's the first rule of planting: lilacs need lots of space to grow. If you're planting a hedge, they'll need a spot at least seven to eight feet wide and ten feet wide for a shrub. They also need at least six hours of sun a day to have excellent flowering. Provide a well-drained, alkaline soil.

https://www.miraclegro.com/en-us/library/trees-shrubs-landscaping/how-grow-lilacs

The ideal spot to plant lilacs is in an area with full sun (at least 6 to 8 hours per day)—give them too much shade and they may not bloom. Lilacs also like slightly alkaline, moist, well-drained soil.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/shrubs/california-lilac/growing-california-lilac-plants.

California Lilac Information Some are upright bushes reaching 8 or 9 feet in height while others are compact, low growing groundcovers that seldom reach more than 6 inches in height.

https://garden.org/frogs/view/8311/

We are planning on moving to Hilo, Hawaii, so I can grow and play in my garden year round. In all honesty, many well-loved garden plants will not thrive and bloom in the tropics. Lilacs need a cold period in order to bloom, as do many bulbs such as daffodils and temperate climate fruit trees, for example.

https://www.laspilitas.com/groups/ceanothus/southern_california_lilacs/southern_california_lilacs.ht

These Lilac species are good for southern California gardens. However, they are just a place to start. Not all may grow in your garden and many from central and northern California may grow just fine as well. California Lilacs, or Ceanothus, are some of our most fragrant and colorful shrubs here in California.

https://growbeautifully.monrovia.com/lilacs-that-love-milder-zones/

Lilacs for Mild Climates. In mild-winter climates, you can't pop just any lilac (Syringa vulgaris) into the ground and be treated to a bounty of blooms come spring. Most lilacs need a long period of winter chill for buds to mature and bloom the following spring.

https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=354

Ceanothus from seed They will then need stratifying (keeping) in cold, moist conditions for up to three months and warm, moist conditions at 16-18°C (61-65°F) thereafter, with germination taking up to three months.

https://www.britannica.com/plant/lilac

Lilac. Lilac, any of about 25 species of fragrant and beautiful northern spring-flowering garden shrubs and small trees constituting the genus Syringa of the family Oleaceae. Lilacs are native to eastern Europe and temperate Asia.