Question - Are calla lilies dangerous for cats?

Answered by: Rebecca Ward  |  Category: General  |  Last Updated: 24-08-2021  |  Views: 1434  |  Total Questions: 14

So the short answer is "yes"—the lily of the valley, peace lily, and calla lily can all cause problems for both cats and dogs. The lily of the valley should be considered very toxic, given it's effect on the heart, while the peace and calla lilies would be considered only mildly toxic to both cats and dogs. McLean says that if your cat has eaten part of a lily, the first thing you'll see is vomiting soon afterwards. Other lilies, like Calla and Peace lilies, don't cause fatal kidney failure, but they can irritate your cat's mouth and esophagus. Lilies of the Valley are toxic to the heart, causing an abnormal heart rhythm. Many people still do not know lilies can be very toxic to our cats. The benign lilies include: Calla lilies, Peruvian lilies, and Peace lilies. These lilies usually cause drooling or foaming at the mouth, pawing at the mouth, and even transient vomiting. Examples of some of these toxic lilies include Asiatic, Easter, Japanese Show, rubrum, stargazer, red, tiger, Western, and wood lilies (Lilium species) and daylilies (Hemerocallis species). Even the pollen or water from the vase can result in severe kidney failure. Cats have a highly evolved sense of smell, and they will detect the scent of lilies the moment it appears in the house. Many cats that ingest lily parts do not survive or are euthanized.

https://www.petpoisonhelpline.com/pet-safety-tips/are-lilies-poisonous-to-cats/

Easter lilies are extremely poisonous to cats, and just 1-2 leaves (or even the pollen) can kill a cat! Even small ingestions can result in severe kidney failure. Sources of poisoning: Many plants of the Lilium and Hemerocallis species are very poisoning.

https://www.petmd.com/cat/emergency/poisoning-toxicity/e_ct_poisonous_plants

Here's a list of some common plants that are toxic to cats: Amaryllis (Amaryllis spp. ) Autumn Crocus (Colchicum autumnale) Azaleas and Rhododendrons (Rhododendron spp. ) Castor Bean (Ricinus communis) Chrysanthemum, Daisy, Mum (Chrysanthemum spp. ) Cyclamen (Cyclamen spp. ) Daffodils, Narcissus (Narcissus spp. )

https://www.apartmenttherapy.com/keeping-your-pets-safe-10-nontoxic-house-plants-aspca-137830

The following plants are non-toxic to both cats and dogs: Blue Echeveria. Bamboo. Areca or Golden Palm. Burro's Tail or Lamb's Tail. Christmas Cactus. Cliff Brake or Button Fern. Hens and Chickens. Pearl Plant.

https://bouqs.com/blog/heres-a-list-of-non-toxic-flowers-that-are-safe-for-your-furry-friend/

If you own a cat or are planning to gift a Bouq to someone who does, here's a list of flowers which are safe for felines: Roses. Sunflowers. Carnations. Snapdragons. Gerbers. Zinnias. Statice. Asters.

https://www.gardendesign.com/flowers/calla-lilies.html

INDOOR CALLA LILY CARE Keep the soil moist, but not soggy. Provide bright, indirect light. Apply liquid fertilizer monthly while in flower. Keep away from heating and ac vents. Reduce watering when the plant enters dormancy (November) Cut the leaves off at soil level once they've died.

https://www.thehealthypetclub.co.uk/poisonous-plants-rabbit/

Poisonous plants and your rabbit Aloe. Apple seeds. Apricot plants (except the fruit) Avocado leaves. Azalea leaves. Begonia. Calendula. Cherry trees.

https://www.vets-now.com/2017/03/spring-plants-warnings-cat-owners/

Although only mildly toxic, chrysanthemums contain pyrethrins, which are used in dog flea and tick medications, and are particularly poisonous to cats. If your cat has eaten chrysanthemums look out for vomiting, diarrhoea and lack of appetite and seek advice from your vet.

https://www.vets4pets.com/pet-health-advice/cat-advice/lily-poisoning-in-cats/

If you do receive lilies, cutting out the stamens can reduce the pollen drop and therefore the risk. However, as all parts of the lily are toxic and even lilies which are not 'true' lilies can cause discomfort, not bringing lilies into a house with cats is considered the safest and recommended course of action.

https://www.thedodo.com/why-arent-we-doing-more-to-pro-511321544.html

Lilies are a popular household plant, especially around Easter and other holidays, when they are frequently given as gifts. Cats are attracted to many plants and will often chew them.

https://www.fda.gov/animal-veterinary/animal-health-literacy/lovely-lilies-and-curious-cats-dangerou

Early signs of lily toxicity in cats include decreased activity level, drooling, vomiting, and loss of appetite. These symptoms start 0 to 12 hours after ingestion. Signs of kidney damage start about 12 to 24 hours after ingestion and include increased urination and dehydration.

http://www.fallsroadvet.com/how-when-to-induce-vomiting-in-your-cat/

Give your cat one teaspoon of hydrogen peroxide for every five pounds of his body weight, but don't give more than three teaspoons per dose. On a liquid syringe, one teaspoon equals 5 ml or 5 cc. Once you have given your cat a dose of hydrogen peroxide, force him to walk around.

https://www.petmd.com/cat/conditions/digestive/c_ct_lily_poisoning

Symptoms and Types In addition, cats that are experiencing lily poisoning will often exhibit signs of depression, diarrhea, dehydration, and lack of appetite (anorexia). If the condition is left untreated, death can occur within four to seven days of ingestion (sooner if the cat consumes a larger amount of the plant).

https://www.salon.com/2016/04/12/not_all_greenery_is_good_10_hazardous_houseplants_to_watch_out_for/

While not all lilies are toxic, many are, including the Easter lily, the tiger lily, the day lily, the calla lily, and the Asian lily. The calla lily is especially dangerous to kids, causing stomach upset, vomiting, skin irritations, blurred vision, and headache. Cats are particularly susceptible to lily toxicity.

https://kb.rspca.org.au/knowledge-base/why-are-lilies-extremely-toxic-to-cats/

Lilies (Lilium spp and Hemerocallis spp) are extremely toxic to cats and can kill them. The entire plant is toxic. Ingesting any part of the plant can cause complete kidney failure in 36-72 hours. The toxicity may occur by ingestion of, or by mouthing, very small amounts of lily material.