Question - Are galvanized nails OK for treated wood?

Answered by: Samuel Thomas  |  Category: General  |  Last Updated: 23-08-2021  |  Views: 914  |  Total Questions: 14

The first rule is: Never use common or bright finished nails. For most applications, however, best nails for pressure treated lumber are either hot dipped galvanized nails and bolts. For screws we recommend using ones that have a protective coating that is designed for use with pressure treated lumber. The manufacturers of ACQ, CA, ACZA and CCA and the treated wood industry are all recommending hot-dipped galvanized nails and stainless steel nails and screws with their treated wood products. Furthermore, they specify that the fasteners meet the ASTM A-153 specification for hot-dipped galvanizing. Hot-dip galvanized or stainless steel fasteners, anchors and hardware are recommended by the Preservative Treated Wood Industry for use with treated wood. This has been the position of this industry for years and their position has not changed with the transition to the alternative copper-based products. Yes you can do this if you want to. Dont use to many nails, another thing you can do if you can get ahold of some Borate treated lumber for the plate you can use regular nails in it without any problems. Borate is white looking with a chalkt like stuff on it. How to Tell if a Nail Is Galvanized Examine the nail visually and note the color of the nail. A galvanized nail has a silvery gray color attributable to the zinc coating. Rub a fingertip across the shaft of the nail. Galvanized nails often have a rough finish. Note the size of the nail.

https://www.oldhouseonline.com/repairs-and-how-to/dos-donts-outdoor-nail-use

Nail manufacturers recommend that you go with aluminum or stainless steel fasteners when you're using either of these woods—and whenever you're using pressure-treated wood. (The preservatives incorporate salts that react with the zinc. ) Also, never use galvanized nails with copper flashing.

http://www.bucket-outlet.com/Does-Galvanized-Steel-Rust.htm

Although it does not last infinitely, galvanized steel is the unparalleled corrosion-resistant metal. It is worth noting however, that applying a protective coating such as paint to galvanized steel will alleviate the problems caused by corrosion of the protective zinc coating.

https://www.nailgundepot.com/blog/everything-to-know-about-galvanized-nails.html

Galvanized steel nails will eventually rust (use stainless steel nails to completely prevent rust), but the galvanization (zinc coat) will prolong the nail's lifespan - as compared to non-coated alternatives.

https://monroeengineering.com/blog/stainless-steel-vs-galvanized/

Much like its counterpart, galvanized steel is also created with the purpose of protecting against rust and corrosion. While galvanized steel is cheaper, stainless steel is stronger. Again, this is due to the fact that it contains chromium, which is stronger and more durable than zinc-covered steel.

Corrosion-resistant stainless steel screws, nails and bolts in grades 304 and 305 can be used for copper-treated wood in most areas, while grade 316 should be used in coastal areas. But stainless steel fasteners can cost five to 10 times more than similar galvanized fasteners.

http://www.bucket-outlet.com/Does-Zinc-Rust.htm

All zinc galvanized coatings are more corrosion resistant than bare iron or steel. Like all ferrous metals, zinc corrodes when exposed to air and water. However, zinc corrodes at a rate of 1/30 of that for steel. Also like other ferrous metals, zinc corrodes or rusts at different rates depending on its environment (8).

https://constructionreviewonline.com/2016/07/hot-dipped-galvanized-compared-to-electro-galvanized/

And another difference is the galvanized surface. And the average thickness of Electro Galvanized is about 8μm–10μm, while the thickness of Hot Dipped Galvanized is 80μm–100μm, even thicker, that is why the weight of HDG scaffolding products are Electro galvanized ones.

https://www.doityourself.com/stry/why-use-galvanized-nails

Galvanized nails undergo a process that involves coating them with zinc to protect them. These rust-resistant nails are great for outdoor applications as they are weatherproof. Apart from oxidation, galvanized nails have an excellent staying power that cling more tightly to the surface they are being nailed into.

https://www.protoolreviews.com/news/nails-screws-pressure-treated-wood/3671/

The first rule is: Never use common or bright finished nails. For most applications, however, best nails for pressure treated lumber are either hot dipped galvanized nails and bolts. For screws we recommend using ones that have a protective coating that is designed for use with pressure treated lumber.

https://lifehacker.com/screws-vs-nails-when-do-you-use-one-or-the-other-5990779

Screws are a "superior" fastener over a nail (they have far superior tensile strength)—especially if you're talking about screwing down decking. Using your deck example—you should use nails to attach the joists to the deck framing but use screws to fasten down the decking itself.

https://www.woodmagazine.com/materials-guide/fasteners/drive-screws-that-dont-corrode

Mechanically galvanized screws are generally suitable for decks and other outdoor projects made of pressure-treated lumber. Nevertheless, you should not use them with PT lumber in contact with the soil, in high-moisture areas, or in areas with salt content in the air.

https://www.thespruce.com/nail-sizes-and-types-1824836

Nails intended for outdoor use are often galvanized or "hot-dipped" with a coating of zinc to improve their weather-resistance.? Stainless steel is also used for outdoor applications, though stainless steel nails are considerably more expensive than zinc-plated nails.

http://www.prowoodlumber.com/en/Blog/2010/March/Is-pressure-treated-wood-safe-for-indoor-use

The simple answer is pressure-treated lumber can be used in any interior application except cutting boards and countertops. Some have also asked, after they've found pressure-treated lumber installed inside their homes, if there is any danger in having it indoors. The answer is no.

https://galvanizeit.org/hot-dip-galvanizing/how-long-does-hdg-last/contact-with-treated-wood

In Contact with Treated Wood. The change in chemical formulations increased the corrosivity of the wood when in contact with metal parts. The two most popular chemicals for wood pressure treatment are alkaline copper quaternary (ACQ) and copper azole (CA), which are both active corrosion materials.