Question - Can I hang my bike upside down?

Answered by: Lillian Perez  |  Category: General  |  Last Updated: 24-06-2022  |  Views: 1436  |  Total Questions: 8

If you're hanging your bike for long periods of time, I have been told that hanging by the rear wheel will help keep the fork seals lubricated. Of course, you can always flip your bike upside down for a couple minutes before a ride to accomplish the same thing. It's not a great idea to hang those bikes upside down because it can allow air into the caliper, or at least into the hose. Similarly, if a bladder-type brake is bled properly, there will be absolutely no air in the bladder or anywhere else in the system, and it won't matter what position the bike is stored in. Many experts believe it's safe to hang a bike by its wheel. Others say that hanging a bicycle on a hook by one wheel may put too much pressure on the rim, potentially causing damage. If excessive air is present in the brake and it is time for a bleed, and the bike is hung from the front wheel, any air in the system will travel up to the master cylinder and impair brake function. We do not recommend hanging a bike with hydraulic brakes by the rear wheel or upside down. Storage Space Each has different applications, but in general, racks that let you store your bike vertically, wheels perpendicular to the wall, ideally positioned in a corner, take up the least space. Some mounts have brackets that fold flat against the wall when not in use—a nice space-saver in close quarters.

https://scoutofmind.com/how-to-store-a-mountain-bike/

Some suggest hanging them by the front or rear wheel or even upside down and claim to have no issues. If you have hydraulic disc brakes, the recommendation is that you never hang them upside down or vertically. When you hang the bike upside down, the air bubbles inside the reservoir tank could move to the calipers.

https://www.familyhandyman.com/garage/storage/great-garage-bike-storage-products/

One of the easiest and least expensive ways to store you bike is with good old-fashioned heavy-duty rubberized hooks made to screw into a stud or rafter. Hang bikes with one hook for vertical bicycle storage, and two hooks placed a bike's width apart for horizontal storage.

https://www.cyclinguk.org/article/guide-bicycle-storage-and-security-home

The simplest and cheapest way to store a number of bikes is to fit wall hooks and then hang them by their wheels. To make the most efficient use of wall space, alternate hanging your bikes by their front and then rear wheels — 'nose to tail' — so that the bars of one bike hang next to the saddle of its neighbour.

https://www.centurycycles.com/tips/tech-talk-storing-bicycles-in-your-home-pg1307.htm

Ideally, you want to store your bike indoors. However, if you live in an apartment or dormitory, you may have no other choice but to store your bike outside. If you MUST store your bicycle outside: Be sure it is locked in the most secure possible way.

http://www.smilepolitely.com/culture/help_your_bike_survive_the_winter/

While leaving your bike outside is not ideal, here are several tips that may help you avoid problems for very little money. Buy some bearing or general purpose waterproof grease. Buy a bike cover. Use shopping Bag for the seat. Apply Frame Saver or WD-40 for steel frames. Keep your tires inflated.

https://www.roadbikerider.com/bicycle-storage-with-bike-hooks-d3/

With the hooks spaced 16 inches apart, you'll invert every other bike to use every hook. In other words, the first bike will be handlebars up, the next bars down, and so on.

https://www.bicyclehabitat.com/how-to/disc-brakes-101-pg362.htm

Hydraulic Disc Brakes Hydraulic discs feature a closed system of hoses and reservoirs containing special hydraulic fluid to operate the brakes. When the lever is activated, a plunger pushes the fluid through the hoses and into the caliper where the pads are pushed onto the rotor, stopping the bike.

https://www.quora.com/Do-my-cars-brakes-always-need-bleeding-when-changing-the-pads-or-discs-And-if-

YES, the brakes should always be “bled” whenever pads and/or discs are changed. In this instance “bleeding” means the removal from the system of some old brake fluid. It does not necessarily mean replacement of all the fluid in the system.