Question - Can olive oil spontaneously combust?

Answered by: Joseph Torres  |  Category: General  |  Last Updated: 24-06-2022  |  Views: 1255  |  Total Questions: 14

Motor oil, canola oil, peanut oil, olive oil, mineral oil none of those will spontaneously combust. That doesn't mean they can't become fuel for another ignition source, and appropriate precautions to that end shouldn't be taken, but there's point in throwing the baby out with the bathwater. Linseed oil and cottonseed oil are materials that can cause spontaneous combustion when disposed of improperly. Motor oil (and anything soaked in motor oil) is less likely to spontaneously combust but it can happen if conditions are just right. However, spontaneous combustion can occur if gasoline-soaked rags reach their auto-ignition point of 495°F-536°F. Olive oil will catch fire after it begins to heat to its smoke point and flash point. Olive oil will start to boil or “pop” first. Following this, you will notice your olive oil beginning to smoke or “burn. ” This is when your olive reaches a dangerous state where it can easily catch fire. Spontaneous combustion of oily rags occurs when rag or cloth is slowly heated to its ignition point through oxidation. A substance will begin to release heat as it oxidizes. This will prevent the oils from oxidizing, and thus keeping the rags from heating up and igniting.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spontaneous_combustion

Spontaneous combustion can occur when a substance with a relatively low ignition temperature (hay, straw, peat, etc. ) begins to release heat. This may occur in several ways, either by oxidation in the presence of moisture and air, or bacterial fermentation, which generates heat.

https://www.chubb.com/why-chubb/articles/rags-to-ruins.aspx

Oil- and solvent-soaked rags will spontaneously combust, even under normal weather conditions; the warmer the weather, the quicker the rags can reach ignition temperature. Used rags or wiping cloths should NEVER be allowed to pile up around a house, garage or construction site.

https://www.simplemost.com/linseed-oil-can-fire-hazard-need-know-stay-safe/

It's a natural substance extracted from flaxseed, but it's also very dangerous. According to a recent article from ABC News, linseed oil can generate heat as it dries, meaning oil-soaked rags or papers can be a very serious fire hazard.

https://www.livescience.com/42080-spontaneous-human-combustion.html

For well over a century, some have claimed that people can suddenly and inexplicably explode into a ball of fire. The phenomenon is called spontaneous human combustion (SHC), and it has been described in many popular books on mysteries and the unexplained.

https://www.statesman.com/news/20140507/dispose-of-oily-rags-household-hazardous-waste-properly

Oil or gas-soaked rags should be safely disposed of after use using two steps: Hang them outside to dry in a safe area or spread them out flat, making sure they are weighted down outdoors. They should not be in a pile. Once they are dry, they should be disposed of properly.

https://www.mutualofenumclaw.com/thinkitthrough/blog-post-page/home-blog-posts/2015/07/14/your-used-

Simply put, rags that contain residue of oil-based paints and stains, paint thinners, varnishes, or polyurethane can spontaneously combust and catch on fire.

https://abcnews.go.com/GMA/ConsumerNews/summer-safety-diy-dangers-linseed-oil/story?id=11328546

Linseed oil in the can is fine. The reason linseed oil doesn't catch fire when you use it on wood is that it is spread out, so it doesn't heat up. Balled-up rags and other debris from projects are the real problem, because the oil is concentrated where it can heat up and the rags, providing fuel for the fire.

https://www.nps.gov/articles/fire-prevention-52-spontaneous-combustion.htm

Fortunately, an employee saw the smoke and the fire was extinguished before significant damage occurred. Rags and towels soaked with oils, including cooking oils; hot laundry left in piles; large compost, mulch, manure, and leaf piles; and moist baled hay can spontaneously combust in the right conditions.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fire_triangle

The Fire Triangle or Combustion Triangle is a simple model for understanding the necessary ingredients for most fires. The triangle illustrates the three elements a fire needs to ignite: heat, fuel, and an oxidizing agent (usually oxygen).

What Happens When You Add Water to a Grease Fire. The polar water molecules and nonpolar oil molecules want to keep as far away from each other as possible. And because water is denser than oil, it sinks right to the bottom of the pan — underneath the grease fire, Dr. Biberdorf explains.

https://www.dsv.com/downloads-and-services/customer-cases/cargill-cocoa-and-chocolate

Chocolate, or more so cocoa, is highly flammable. If it catches fire, the blaze is difficult to extinguish since cocoa powder contains 10 to 20 per cent fat and has a huge surface area in powder form.

https://www.hippo.com/blog/how-to-avoid-fire-hazards-in-your-home?

Flammable and combustible liquids Besides gasoline and lighter fluid, things like rubbing alcohol, nail polish remover, hand sanitizer and wart remover can easily catch fire.

https://www.napoleon.com/en/ca/barbecues/how-prevent-grease-fires

Baking soda is the most effective form of fire extinguisher; it quickly cuts off the oxygen supply to the flame. Keep a box or 2 in or near your grill station, as well as a fire extinguisher. Salt will also work in smothering a flame. DO NOT use flour, or water ever when you need to put out a grease fire.

https://www.erieinsurance.com/blog/six-flammable-foods

Six Flammable Foods Garlic. Why it's risky: This potent food is packed with lots of natural oil, so it burns quickly and pops when placed in a hot pan, causing oil to splatter into the burner. Bacon. Deep-fried stuffed peppers. Flour. Alcohol-based sauces. Peanut brittle and other ultra-sugary foods.