Question - Can Olives be eaten straight from the tree?

Answered by: Kelly Alexander  |  Category: General  |  Last Updated: 24-06-2022  |  Views: 1123  |  Total Questions: 13

Olives, like many other kinds of produce such as potatoes and sour cherries, just aren't something that you eat raw. Unprocessed, straight off the tree, they are bitter, very bitter, and the green ones even more so than ones which have fully ripened to black. Olives picked off the tree contain a very bitter compound called oleuropein. Harvested olives must be “cured” to remove the bitterness in order to make them palatable. The most common curing processes use brine, dry salt, water, or lye treatments. Typically harvested in the late summer, freshly picked olives have a bitter taste at first. Traditionally, olives are cured in a brine, or a solution of salt and water, to remove their bitterness. Looking into this more, fresh olives contain oleuropein, a substance that gives them their disgusting bitter taste when fresh. You need to process olives in salty brine in order to extract the oleuropein to make them edible. Olives are oily and Salty. Black olives are softer than green olives, usually. Combine 1 part salt to 10 parts water and pour over the olives in a bowl or pot. Weigh them down with a plate and let sit for 1 week. Drain the olives and repeat the brining process for another week. Do this two more times so they brine for about a month or so.

https://www.beniciamagazine.com/harvesting-and-processing-backyard-olives/

Most olives are ready to harvest when the juice turns cloudy, at the “green ripe” stage in late September. They ripen to an uneven reddish-brown through November, finally darkening to the “naturally black ripe” stage by early December. Olives in this stage have a high oil content and are easily bruised.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/fruits/olive/harvesting-olive-trees.htm

Olives left on the ground will rot and can foster disease and olive fruit flies. If you are picking olives to brine, pick green olives when they are mature but before they begin to change color. All olives on the tree will not be in the same state of maturity, so you can continue to pick for brine curing as they ripen.

https://www.wikihow.com/Cure-Olives

Place the olives in a glass storage container. Mix 6 tablespoons pickling salt in a gallon of water and pour it over the olives to cover them. Let the olives cure for a week, at which point they're ready to eat. Store the olives in the refrigerator in their brine for up to a few weeks.

https://www.wikihow.com/Cure-Olives

Place the olives in a glass storage container. Mix 6 tablespoons pickling salt in a gallon of water and pour it over the olives to cover them. Let the olives cure for a week, at which point they're ready to eat. Store the olives in the refrigerator in their brine for up to a few weeks.

https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/howto/guide/are-olives-good-you

What is a healthy portion size for olives? 15-20g which is about four to five olives per adult. Olives are quite versatile and can either be consumed as snack, added to salads or cooking.

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/foods/olives

Olives are very high in vitamin E and other powerful antioxidants. Studies show that they are good for the heart and may protect against osteoporosis and cancer. The healthy fats in olives are extracted to produce olive oil, one of the key components of the incredibly healthy Mediterranean diet.

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/green-black-olives_n_56e9a34ee4b0860f99db4d6e

"There are no nutritional differences between green and black olives. Olives are endowed with high amounts of good monounsaturated fat and minerals, such as iron and copper. They're also rich in vitamin E, polyphenols and flavonoids, which are antioxidants [that] have anti-inflammatory benefits. "

https://www.thedailymeal.com/eat/what-happens-if-you-eat-raw-olive

When eaten raw, olives are extremely bitter and, for all intents and purposes, completely inedible. Not only is the texture completely different from what you'll find after they've been processed (they're more mealy and mushy), they also contain a substance called oleuropein that makes them bitter.

https://www.oliveoiltimes.com/world/olive-oil-tasting/8640

The third of the three positive attributes of olive oil, in addition to fruity and pungent, is bitter. Bitterness, like pungency, is also an acquired taste. As anyone who has ever tasted an olive right off the tree can attest, bitter is a prominent taste in fresh olives.

https://www.akc.org/expert-advice/nutrition/can-dogs-eat-olives/

Dogs can eat olives in moderation. But an olive now and then won't hurt him. While olives themselves don't contain any toxic ingredients, the pits pose some hazards. Olive pits may cause choking or obstructions in dogs.

https://www.justanswer.com/dog-health/4epo4-raw-olives-uncurred-drop-tree-toxic-dogs.html

Raw olives are not themselves toxic to dogs. However anything including vegetables that are eaten in large numbers can cause an upset tummy.

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/green-black-olives_n_56e9a34ee4b0860f99db4d6e

"The color of the olive corresponds to how ripe they are when picked, in addition to the curing process they undergo. Green olives are picked before ripening, and black olives are picked while ripe, which is when the color has turned from green to black.