Question - Can you get shingles when you're 20?

Answered by: Karen Morgan  |  Category: General  |  Last Updated: 23-08-2021  |  Views: 1156  |  Total Questions: 14

The Basics: Shingles If you've had chicken pox, then you can get shingles. That might put them at greater risk for shingles, and at a younger age, " says Rafael Harpaz, MD, a CDC medical epidemiologist who has been studying the shingles virus for 15 years. Shingles triggers and risk factors Children, teenagers, and young adults can get shingles, but most people who have outbreaks, are over 50 years old. A weakened immune system may also trigger shingles. Good nutrition and getting enough sleep are important because they may help keep your immune system strong. Shingles is caused by the varicella-zoster virus — the same virus that causes chickenpox. After you recover from chickenpox, the virus can enter your nervous system and lie dormant for years. Eventually, it may reactivate and travel along nerve pathways to your skin — producing shingles. Stress can interfere with your immune system, so it's one of the things that makes contracting a case of shingles more likely at any age. Some forms of cancers, HIV and certain medications can depress the immune system too, increasing the risk of shingles. Share on Pinterest Shingles results from the same virus that causes chicken pox. Shingles usually affects one side of the body. This is most often the waist, chest, abdomen, or back. Symptoms can also appear on the face and in the eyes, mouth, ears.

https://www.verywellfamily.com/is-shingles-contagious-2634655

Yes, people with shingles are contagious. Shingles are caused by the chickenpox virus which has been dormant (staying quiet) in your body ever since you had chickenpox. So, you get shingles from your own chickenpox virus, not from someone else. "

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/314047

Shingles can sometimes be mistaken for another skin conditions, such as hives, psoriasis, or eczema. The shingles rash also tends to clear up in a few weeks. Rashes due to eczema and psoriasis may last longer. A shingles rash is also usually a lot more painful than other rashes.

https://www.everydayhealth.com/pictures/shingles-other-skin-conditions/

The shingles virus causes an outbreak of a red rash and blisters across the face and body, like many other skin conditions — psoriasis, allergies, eczema, and hives among them. A shingles rash may have mild to severe pain, and the viral rash most commonly appears along a band called a dermatome.

https://www.everydayhealth.com/shingles/stress-management.aspx

Stress doesn't technically cause shingles, but it can cause your immune system to weaken — and a weakened immune system can put you at risk for shingles. A viral illness, shingles is caused by varicella zoster virus, the same virus that causes chickenpox.

https://www.idsociety.org/news--publications-new/articles/2018/cancer-patients-face-higher-risk-for-

Shingles, or herpes zoster, is caused by the varicella zoster virus, the same virus that causes chickenpox. In the study, researchers found that, overall, a cancer diagnosis of any kind was associated with about a 40 percent increase in risk for developing shingles compared to the risk in someone without cancer.

https://www.health.ny.gov/diseases/communicable/shingles/fact_sheet.htm

Shingles is not usually dangerous to healthy individuals although it can cause great misery during an attack. Very rarely, shingles can lead to pneumonia, hearing problems, blindness, brain inflammation (encephalitis) or death. For about one person in five, severe pain can continue even after the rash clears up.

https://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/shingles/qa/will-my-shingles-come-back

If you've had shingles once, you probably won't get it again. That doesn't mean it can't happen; it's just unlikely. Also called herpes zoster, shingles can come back a second or, rarely, a third time. However, you can take steps to help prevent it, or ease it the next time around.

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/ask-a-health-expert/im-a-healthy-guy-why-am-

Shingles are caused by the varicella zoster virus, the same bug behind chicken pox. The reason shingles occur is not entirely clear, but in the majority of cases it's the result of a weakened immune system from conditions such as chronic disease, cancer, HIV or overwhelming stress.

https://www.healthline.com/health/shingles-contagious

However, you can spread the varicella-zoster virus from the time that your symptoms start until your rash and blisters have crusted dry. If you have shingles and are otherwise healthy, you can still go out in public or to work. But you should be sure to follow these tips: Keep the shingles rash clean and covered.

https://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/shingles/symptoms-of-shingles

The first sign of shingles, which is also called herpes zoster, is pain that might feel like burning or tingling on one side of your face, chest, back, or waist. It can be intense. You might also feel like you're coming down with the flu, with symptoms such as: Fever.

https://www.aad.org/public/diseases/a-z/shingles-treatment

A dermatologist can often diagnose shingles by looking at the rash on your skin.

The first symptoms of shingles are unusual skin sensations. Other symptoms include confusion, fatigue, fever, headache, memory loss, an upset stomach and stomach pain. These symptoms generally occur one to five days before a painful rash appears on one side of the body or face.

https://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/shingles/do-i-have-shingles

Doctors use two types of tests to diagnose chickenpox or shingles: Antibody: When you're exposed to varicella zoster, your immune system makes proteins to fight it. Your doctor can look for these proteins, called antibodies, in a sample of your blood. Your symptoms and test results will show whether you have shingles.