Question - Can you get shocked in a pool?

Answered by: Jimmy Bailey  |  Category: General  |  Last Updated: 23-08-2021  |  Views: 1064  |  Total Questions: 12

Faulty bonding/grounding is the cause of many pool electrocution incidents. This can send electricity through a pool light even if it's not on during the daytime. Anything that has electricity running to it AND is underwater is a potential hazard. Keep the pool deck clear of electronics and power cords (at least 10 feet from the water), to prevent an electronic device from falling or being pulled into the water. Choose battery-powered devices to have around the pool if possible. Because these lights operate at a very low voltage, they are less inherently dangerous when taken on their own. Some believe the 120 volts generated by an incandescent light can introduce a fatal charge, whereas the power from low-voltage lights, generally 12 volts, can injure but not kill. When a pool is shocked, normally with calcium hypochlorite, a chemical reaction takes place. All forms of chlorine turn in hypochlorus acid when mixed with water. The chemical reaction can cause irritated skin or eyes. Normally it take 2-4 hours for everything to balance out and be safe to swim in. But ungrounded pool pump motors pose the serious threat of electrocution. When a device or product is defective, improperly installed or maintained, or if a component of that device is worn or frayed, anyone who comes in contact with water charged with an electrical current is at risk of electric shock drowning.

http://www.inyopools.com/Blog/tips-troubleshooting-pool-light/

As we all should know, water and light sockets do not mix. A leaky pool light stems from a bad lens gasket. A fixture filled with water can also cause a breaker to trip, so be mindful of that when troubleshooting. Replacing a pools light lens gasket is pretty simple and even the more novice pool owners can do the job.

https://www.riverpoolsandspas.com/blog/pool-lighting-options-and-why-leds-are-the-best-option

LEDs also change colors and have several light show settings. LED bulbs have a very long life span…about 30, 000 hours compared to the 5, 000 hours of the incandescent and the 6, 000 hours fiber optics.

https://www.sunsationalswimschool.com/blog/2016/10/storms-and-water-safety

A: Swimming during a thunderstorm is one of the most dangerous things you can do. Lightning regularly strikes water, and since water conducts electricity, a nearby lightning strike could kill or injure you. To be really safe, you should not swim in an indoor pool when lightning is around.

https://ask-the-electrician.com/electrical-code-and-swimming-pool-light-fixtures/

The National Electrical Code – Article 680-20a1 states that a pool light fixture over 15 volts must be GFCI Protected.

https://www.doityourself.com/forum/electrical-ac-dc/60901-grounding-bonding-wet-niche-pool-light.htm

Just float the wire nut joining all equipment grounding conductors size 12 ga. [green] in the air and inside the pool light box. Then I would run the #8 green bonding grid wires coming from the inside of each wet niche into that box and connect them to that grounding bar found inside that pool light box.

https://blog.thepoolfactory.com/often-shock-swimming-pool

Always make sure that the filter system is running while shocking the pool. Some pool owners choose to shock their pools once every 1-2 weeks as normal maintenance. This is a great way to keep your chlorine level up and prevent algae growth.

https://www.troublefreepool.com/threads/anyone-successfully-shocked-a-green-pool-with-pump-off.39602

There isn't much point in shocking with out a working pump. Even if it works, which is somewhat doubtful, the pool will just get algae again in a few days. You also have a major task trying to get the chemicals to mix uniformly without a pump.

https://sunplay.com/blogs/posts/do-pool-chemicals-expire

So if you buy liquid shock, be aware that it only lasts one to two months at the most before it starts to lose effectiveness. While many swimming pool chemicals stay good for years if stored correctly, some pool-maintenance supplies expire more quickly.

https://www.swimuniversity.com/pool-maintenance-mistakes/

Shocking Your Swimming Pool During The Day Shocking gets rid of chloramines and helps bring your pool's chlorine levels to a well-balanced 3 parts per million (ppm). But while daytime is great for enjoying your pool, it's the wrong time to shock. See, shock is unstabilized chlorine.

https://www.myperfectpool.com.au/much-chlorine-pool-dangers-lower-2.html

Of course, too much chlorine in pool water can be dangerous. Exposure to over-chlorination can provoke asthma, lung irritation, and potentially skin and eye irritation. As well as being potentially bad for you, it's bad for your pool. High chlorine levels lower the pH of the water.

https://homeguides.sfgate.com/high-chlorine-levels-down-swimming-pools-44284.html

If the chlorine level is too high, take immediate steps to bring it down to a lower level. Discontinue your regular maintenance program of adding chlorine until the level is lowered. If you have an automatic chlorine feeder, turn it off.