Question - Can you use bite marks in court?

Answered by: Eric Garcia  |  Category: General  |  Last Updated: 23-06-2022  |  Views: 790  |  Total Questions: 14

After a case in 1975, when a perpetrator made clear bite marks in the cartilage of a murder victim's nose, this type of evidence became admissible in courts across the country. The American Board of Forensic Odontology was established in 1976 to certify forensic odontologists. High-profile criminal cases His bite marks and the bite marks of other people were compared to the victim's marks. The judges readily accepted the bite marks as evidence and this was the first time in what would become the United States that bite marks were used as evidence to solve a crime. Background. Bite mark analysis is an imperative area of forensic odontology and considered the commonest form of dental evidence presented in the criminal court. The process of comparing bite marks with a suspect's dentition includes analysis and measurement of shape, size, and position of an individual's teeth. Crimes commonly associated with biting are homicide, rape, sexual assault, robbery, and child abuse. [1] The crime type, age, and sex of the subject impact on the likely anatomical location of a bite injury. Hence, recognition of the locations and characteristics of bite marks will assist to solve the crime. In order to collect a sample bite mark from the suspect, an investigator must obtain a warrant and then they can proceed to make a mold of the suspect's teeth as well as take photos of the suspect's mouth in various positions.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3941620/

Bite marks left in substances which are malleable like cheese have a more potential for accurate identification. A characteristics in a human bite mark is a distinguish feature, trial or pattern within the bite mark and is delivered as a class or an individual characteristic.

https://www.healthline.com/health/how-long-do-hickeys-last

Just like a bruise, a hickey can last anywhere from one to two weeks, changing color along the way as your body absorbs the blood.

https://medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000736.htm

To care for the wound: Stop the wound from bleeding by applying direct pressure with a clean, dry cloth. Wash the wound. Use mild soap and warm, running water. Rinse the bite for 3 to 5 minutes. Apply an antibacterial ointment to the wound. This may help reduce the chance for infection. Put on a dry, sterile bandage.

https://www.mayoclinic.org/first-aid/first-aid-human-bites/basics/art-20056633

Human bites can be as dangerous as or even more dangerous than animal bites because of the types of bacteria and viruses contained in the human mouth. Human bites that break the skin can become infected. And a cut on the knuckles from your own teeth, such as from a fall, is considered a human bite.

https://www.indiatoday.in/lifestyle/relationship/story/ways-to-get-rid-of-a-hickey-love-bite-fast-ho

You can either use a heat pad or apply some cloth soaked in warm water on the area. Take a comb or a toothbrush (preferably new) and rub it on the love bite. Be gentle, as harsh rubbing could break the skin. This will help reduce the discoloration by lessening the intensity of the coagulated blood.

https://explorehealthcareers.org/career/forensic-science/forensic-odontologist/

Forensic Odontologist. Forensic odontologists are highly experienced, specially trained dentists who use their expertise to help identify unknown remains and trace bite marks to a specific individual. The forensic odontologist may be called in to do so by police officers, the medical examiner or the coroner.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15245686

Most often the role of the forensic odontologist is to establish a person's identity. Teeth, with their physiologic variations, pathoses and effects of therapy, record information that remains throughout life and beyond. Forensic odontology has an important role in the recognition of abuse among persons of all ages.

http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/health/2013/12/02/how-experts-identify-crash-victims-through-dental-reco

Dental records can be used to identify remains when no other options exist. To make an ID, a forensic dentist compares the dental records from when a person was alive to photographs, X -rays and visual observation of a person's teeth after death, Sonkin explained.

https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/218901-overview

Human bites have been shown to transmit hepatitis B, hepatitis C, herpes simplex virus (HSV), syphilis, tuberculosis, actinomycosis, and tetanus. Evidence suggests transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) through human bites is possible but very unlikely.

https://www.amboss.com/us/knowledge/Postmortem_skin_changes

Livor mortis refers to the bluish-purple discoloration (lividity) under the skin of the lower body parts due to gravitation of blood after death. Onset of lividity, its location and color, provide information on the time and cause of death.

https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/biting_in_child_care

If a child is bitten while in child care or at play, here's what you should do: If the skin is not broken, clean the wound with soap and water. Apply a cold compress and soothe the child. If the skin is broken: Let the wound bleed gently. Do not squeeze it. Clean the wound carefully with soap and water.

https://www.researchgate.net/post/Can_DNA_be_obtained_from_teeth_that_have_broken_enamel

But dentine contains more DNA, and in addition the pulp contains cells and vessels that are protected by the dentine, cement and enamel, and these are the best sources of DNA in a tooth, to identify human remains or even to do ancient DNA studies.

https://emergency.cdc.gov/agent/cyanide/basics/facts.asp

Cyanide can be a colorless gas, such as hydrogen cyanide (HCN) or cyanogen chloride (CNCl), or a crystal form such as sodium cyanide (NaCN) or potassium cyanide (KCN). Cyanide sometimes is described as having a “bitter almond” smell, but it does not always give off an odor, and not everyone can detect this odor.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dog_bite

A dog bite is a bite upon a person or other animal by a dog. More than one successive bite is often called a dog attack, although dog attacks can include knock-downs and scratches. Though many dog bites do not result in injury, they can result in infection, disfigurement, temporary or permanent disability, or death.