Question - Can you use bleach instead of chlorine in a swimming pool?

Answered by: Frances Torres  |  Category: General  |  Last Updated: 23-06-2022  |  Views: 1488  |  Total Questions: 14

With a Conditioner level of 30 ppm-50 ppm using bleach or liquid chlorine is all you need. The chemical in bleach is the same chemical found in liquid chlorine sold by you local pool store or hardware store. Bleach is just weaker by volume than liquid chlorine. They are identical in every way, with the exception of strength. Household bleach is usually a 6% concentration (although some of the cheaper stuff is 3%), while pool chlorine can typically be found in strength between 10% and 12%. All of this is sodium hypochlorite, and works the same in sanitizing your water. There are alternatives to chlorine including bromine, ionizers, and ozonators, though with each you'll still need to use some chlorine. A fourth alternative is PHMB, which doesn't require the use of any chlorine. All four have drawbacks, including cost. Chlorine is relatively cheap. The solution to maintaining a clear pool is to use readily available liquid bleach as your chlorine source. Chlorine bleach, as discussed above, is not bound to a stabilizer, so when you add chlorine bleach to the pool, it will go right to work killing microbes and sanitizing. Pool chlorine and household bleach both contain hypochlorite ion, which is the chemical agent responsible for their “bleaching” action. Pool chlorine, however, is substantially stronger than household bleach.

https://agwt.org/content/water-well-disinfection-procedure

Do not use excessive amounts of bleach - more is not more effective. 5) For best results the bleach should be combined with water before adding it to the well. [By reducing the concentration there is less chance of corrosion of the cables and pipes in the well.

http://www.greenriverplantation.net/how-to-clean-your-pool-without-chemicals/

How to Clean Your Pool Without Chemicals Replace the chlorine with salt. Chlorine is the most common solution for cleaning swimming pools and one of the most dangerous as well. Cover the pool to keep debris away. Let the robotic pool cleaner do the job. Oxygen pool cleaning technology. Use sphagnum moss.

https://www.intheswim.com/eGuides/when-to-swim-after-adding-pool-chemicals

It is recommended to wait at least 20 minutes to an hour after adding water balancing chemicals. You should wait 2-4 hours (or one full cycle through the filter) to swim from the moment you use calcium chloride in your pool. It is safe to swim once your chlorine levels are around 5 ppm or after 24 hours.

https://aces.nmsu.edu/pubs/_m/M115/welcome.html

Mix 2 quarts bleach in 10 gallons of water; pour into well. Connect a garden hose to a nearby faucet and wash down the inside of the well. Open each faucet and let the water run until a strong chlorine odor is detected, then turn it off and go to the next one. Don't forget outdoor faucets and hydrants.

Using Bleach as a Shock You need to use less of such products per volume than you do if you simply add chlorine, and if you opt for chlorine alone, you need more bleach than you do pool chlorine. Bleach contains the same chemical -- sodium hypochlorite -- as pool chlorine, but the concentrations are different.

https://www.doityourself.com/stry/how-to-treat-inflatable-pool-water

While commercially purchased chlorine is one of the best ways to treat the water in larger inflatable pools, smaller pools that are fewer than 20 feet wide need less chemicals to treat the water. Using a mixture of pool chlorine with over the counter chlorine bleach is a good solution for keeping a clean pool.

https://news.poolandspa.com/how-to-clear-up-and-clean-a-green-swimming-pool/

Start off by adding 3 or 4 gallons, and if you see no results overnight, add 3 or 4 more gallons the next day. Continue this process until you notice the water changing color to either cloudy white, light green or clear. YOU CANNOT OVER SHOCK A POOL! The more you add, the quicker it will clear!

https://www.clorox.com/how-to/outdoor-cleaning/pools/cleaning-in-ground-pool/

There's a protocol when using Clorox® Regular Bleach2 for swimming pool disinfection. bleach per 10, 000 gallons of water, in addition to regular chlorination, algae growth can be prevented. However, it depends on several factors including how much the pool is used, sun exposure, and water quality.

You normally need 6 quarts of bleach per 10, 000 gallons of water, so to kill algae, you might want to increase this to 8 quarts ( 2 gallons) per 10, 000 gallons. If the pool water is very green and cloudy, consider doubling the basic dosage. Just remember to stay out of the water until the chlorine drops to safe levels.

https://poolmandave.blogspot.com/2013/09/can-i-use-clorox-bleach-in-my-pool.html

Typically liquid chlorine is 10-12% Sodium Hypochlorite where bleach is about 5-6% Sodium Hypochlorite. Adding Sodium Hypochlorite to the pool water makes HOCI which is the disease and organism destroying element in chlorine. So in fact bleach is the same as liquid chlorine only weaker.

https://www.h2ouse.org/how-much-bleach-to-add-to-a-pool/

If you need to calculate how much bleach or Clorox you need to shock your pool, you will have to use 1/2 gallon of bleach per 10, 000 gallons of water to raise the chlorine levels by 5 ppm.

https://www.scripps.edu/newsandviews/e_20060213/bleach.html

Bleach is more effective at killing germs when diluted than when used straight out of the bottle. For most uses, a ratio of nine parts water to one part bleach is recommended. Bleach can expire. After a shelf life of six months, bleach starts to degrade.

https://www.armandhammer.com/articles/diy-pool-maintenance-tips

To cure cloudy pool water, superchlorination is usually the easiest fix. Be sure to test your pH levels after the hyper-chlorination treatment, and slowly add baking soda to your pool water, if needed, to get to between 7. 2 and 7. 8. Higher pH levels can lead to cloudiness.

Bleach Versus Pool Chlorine Common pool chlorine is made up of the chemical calcium hypochlorite at about 65 percent strength. Household bleach is a liquid that contains sodium hypochlorite, which is simply chlorine in its liquid form. Bleach, however, is typically only 5 to 6 percent chlorine.