Question - Can you use LED bulbs in old fixtures?

Answered by: Tammy Gonzales  |  Category: General  |  Last Updated: 24-06-2022  |  Views: 978  |  Total Questions: 13

” The simple answer is yes, as long as the LED bulb uses less wattage than your fixture. Mistake #1: Mixing LED bulbs with incandescent bulbs is ok. No, it is not. Mixing LED with incandescent lighting causes poor performance. If using both on the same circuit, your incandescent light will draw more power, causing the LED to flicker. The better advice would be, if you change one, change them all. To get the benefits of LED without replacing all your existing fixtures, all you need to do is replace all your incandescent screw-in lightbulbs with screw-in LED bulbs. Just make sure that you replace your incandescent bulb with a comparable LED that will match the performance of the previous bulb. Screw-in LEDs require no retrofitting into existing sockets because they contain not just the light-emitting diode but also the electronic driver that makes it work. (In a special LED fixture, by contrast, the driver is in the light fixture and the bulb contains only the diode. Using an LED bulb in an enclosed fixture when it isn't designed for that may cause the bulb to overheat, potentially causing damage to the light bulb and fixture. Even a little extra heat can shorten the lifespan of the bulb and keep you from enjoying the full value of your investment.

https://www.earthled.com/blogs/light-2-0-the-earthled-blog-led-lighting-news-tips-reviews/36300676-c

If your socket says not to exceed 60-Watts, it is referring the dangers of high heat output associated with incandescent bulbs. However, LED's do not emit dangerous levels of heat. Thus, if your fixture says “not to exceed 60-Watts” but you want to use a 100-Watt equivalent LED bulb, this would be safe to do so.

https://www.realtor.com/advice/home-improvement/flickering-lights/

Light dimmers with incompatible lightbulbs (such as LEDs) can flicker when they're set on low. Fortunately, this is not a dangerous situation either, however annoying it may be. “The only solution is to try a different type or brand of LED light, or change the dimmer itself, ” suggests Orr.

https://diy.stackexchange.com/questions/48912/can-i-use-an-led-bulb-in-a-incandescent-only-fixture

If the fixture is dimmable and the LED bulb is not, the bulb may flicker or not come on. (LED bulbs generate much less heat than incandescents, but they do generate some and they're a lot more sensitive to overheating). Some LED bulbs say they're OK in enclosed fixtures.

https://www.ledbyvision.co.uk/article/do-led-lights-create-fire-risks

LED lights do not emit light from a vacuum as most other bulb types do. Overheating is one of the reasons a bulb could start a fire, but that is highly unlikely to happen with LED lights. They may feel hot to touch, but they produce light at a significantly lower temperature than other bulbs.

https://learn.eartheasy.com/guides/led-light-bulbs-comparison-charts/

Equivalent Wattages and Light Output of Incandescent, CFL, and LED Bulbs Light Output LEDs Incandescents Lumens Watts Watts 450 4-5 40 750-900 6-8 60 1100-1300 9-13 75-100

https://www.dmlights.com/help/lighting/replace-incandescent-halogen-bulbs-with-led-bulbs/

Yes, in many cases, you can simply replace your bulbs separately, one by one. We guide you through the most important steps for selecting replacement LED bulbs for most commonly used fittings. Furthermore, LEDs can handle all hues of white light, so the warm yellowish light of halogen bulbs is perfectly within reach!

https://integral-led.com/education/dimmable-and-non-dimmable-led-lamps

Dimming LED lamps can save energy and changes the visual appearance and mood of your space. You can use a dimmable LED lamp in a non-dimmable circuit. You should NOT use a non-dimmable lamp in a dimmable circuit as it may cause damage to the lamp and or circuit.

https://lamphq.com/led-lights-glow/

LED light stores energy The first two reasons can be found in the LED light itself. You can easily check this by removing the illuminant from the socket immediately after turning off the light switch. If the bulb continues to glow weakly after removal, it is due to the luminescent layer or the LED driver.

https://oeo.com/cant-use-certain-led-bulbs-enclosed-fixtures/

Unfortunately, due to the heat entrapment of enclosed fixtures, not all LED light bulbs can be used. Or perhaps it is better to say that they should not be used. It may still be possible to use your regular LED bulb in the enclosed fixture, but with a shortened life span and the potential for premature dimming.

https://blog.1000bulbs.com/home/100w-equal-led-bulb

One question that often comes up is this: “Can I use an LED with a higher wattage equivalent than the bulb I am replacing, such as a 100-Watt equal LED bulb in a 60-Watt rated socket, to get more light from my fixture? ” The short answer is yes—as long as it still consumes fewer watts than the fixture is rated for.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/2018/07/25/how-stop-your-led-lights-flickering/

LED bulb flickering can be traced in almost every instance to a non-compatible dimmer switch in the lighting circuit. LED bulbs don't have glowing filaments. When the dimmer switch goes off and on many times per second, the LED bulb becomes a flickering strobe light.

https://www.digitaltrends.com/home/how-to-dispose-of-light-bulbs/

The electrical current passes through a microchip, which lights up tiny LEDs. LEDs do not contain hazardous chemicals, so it is safe to throw them away in the trashcan. However, some of the components in LED bulbs may be recyclable.

https://www.blackdogled.com/faq_leds-and-heat

LEDs' electroluminescence technology is entirely different and does not require heat to produce light; LEDs themselves will not get hot enough to start a fire. Much of the energy used by HID lights is emitted as infrared light (above 800 nanometers).