Question - Can you use LED lights for aquarium plants?

Answered by: Cheryl Turner  |  Category: General  |  Last Updated: 24-06-2022  |  Views: 726  |  Total Questions: 14

Yes. LED lights are good for aquarium plants. The fact is, different plants require different levels of light. LED lighting has made amazing progress in the growth of exotic plants with some higher-end fixtures, but even the most inexpensive LED fixtures specifically made for aquariums will be adequate for successful and healthy plant growth in a community aquarium. Light Requirements for Aquatic Plants Aquatic plants do best under full spectrum light with a Kelvin rating or “color temperature” between 6, 500K and 8, 000K. Always choose a light source specifically designed for growing aquarium plants; those designed for houseplants have a lower Kelvin rating. The most common form of aquarium lighting is T8 and T5 florescent bulbs. Both are capable of growing plants, however T5's are recommended. T5 bulbs are more powerful, and better suited to growing aquarium plants in a densely planted setup. One full length T5 bulb is often enough to grow most aquarium plants. Low heat output: LED lights do not generate the heat that fluorescent light bulbs do, and so they won't heat up your aquarium water. However, they still need good air circulation so the heat they put off doesn't degrade the lifespan of the LED chip, and keep them away from other types of lighting.

https://www.aquariumforum.com/f2/do-led-s-help-pevent-algae-74177.html

phosphates, light l, and others are variables. Between fluorescent and LED light, LEDs cause less algae. They don't PREVENT algae, but the spectral response of an LED array is much better tailored to plants, as opposed to algae.

https://www.urbanorganicyield.com/regular-led-light-bulbs-as-plant-grow-lights/

Technically, yes you can use any LED lights to grow plant, but that doesn't ensure your plants will grow healthy or efficiently, as regular LED lights will not contain enough color or light spectrum which plants need to Photosynthesis. So if you want to grow indoor, It's better buy a specialized LED grow lights.

https://www.thesprucepets.com/how-long-should-aquarium-lights-be-left-on-1380774

Light and Algae Levels If excess algae is a problem in the aquarium, a contributing factor is usually too much light. Too much light causes more algae growth. Reduce the time the aquarium lights are on to eight hours, or a bit less if necessary, to help reduce the algae growth.

https://www.thesprucepets.com/common-new-aquarium-mistakes-1380712

In the beginning, only add a couple of small hardy fish. Wait until both the ammonia and nitrite levels have risen and then fallen to zero before adding more fish. It usually take about 3-6 weeks for a new aquarium to go through the initial Nitrogen cycle, so fish should be added only a few per week during this time.

https://www.practicalfishkeeping.co.uk/features/problem-solver-nuisance-algae/

Blue lighting can cause excess algae in freshwater and low Kelvin lighting, peaking in the red, can encourage algae in marine aquaria. Bulbs and tubes degrade over time, lowering their Kelvin rating, possibly causing more algae and producing light less useable by plants or corals.

https://www.fishtankhobbyist.com/best-aquarium-lighting-for-fish-color/

Full Spectrum Capacity For example, white light is great for showing off blue and fluorescent hues, while blue light is great for green, blue or red fish. Magenta light is ideal for bringing out the best in red-colored fish. Experiment with the different colors to discover what you and your fish like best.

https://tropica.com/en/guide/make-your-aquarium-a-success/light/

If you have chosen nothing but "Easy" plants, 10-20 lumen (0. 25 to 0. 5 watts) per litre is adequate. For "Medium" plants, we recommend 20-40 lumen (0. 5 to 1 watts) per litre, while "Advanced" plants require more than 40 lumens (1 watt) per litre.

https://pethelpful.com/fish-aquariums/light-in-the-planted-aquarium

Plants use a specific kind of blue light called Actinic Blue for vegetative growth. Vegetative growth is the growth of the plant leaves and stems. Growing plants entirely under Actinic Blue light will make them grow very bushy and leafy.

https://thatlovelypet.com/can-aquarium-plants-grow-in-gravel/

In short, yes. Certain species of aquatic flora can grow in gravel. This will depend on the type of gravel that you have. Large chunky aquarium rock gravel isn't an ideal substrate material choice.

https://pets.thenest.com/should-turn-fish-aquarium-light-off-night-4371.html

Most fish require both periods of light and darkness. Aquarium lights can illuminate fish colors, make it easier to spot tank problems and regulate your fish's sleeping and eating. All fish need periods of darkness, and turning the lights off at night will help you mimic your pet's natural environment.

https://biology.stackexchange.com/questions/65295/can-fish-live-in-the-dark-completely

There are lots of fish that live in environments without any light (below 1000m in the ocean there is no useful light for vision), however most aquarium fish have not evolved to live in those sorts of conditions.

https://www.seeker.com/fish-listen-to-music-prefer-bach-1767775798.html

Fish Listen to Music, Prefer Bach. Goldfish are no dummies when it comes to music, and they can distinguish between two well-known composers. Goldfish not only listen to music, but they also can distinguish one composer from another, a new study finds.

https://aquariawise.com/how-long-to-leave-aquarium-light-on

Keep your aquarium light on for the recommended 8 to 12 hours then turn off the light to mimic the natural day and night cycle. In case your fish gets restless when the lights go out, turn off the room overhead light an hour before your tank lights.

https://riverratguide.com/can-fish-see-in-the-dark/

The short answer is yes, some fish can see in the dark and in low light. What humans may interpret as the dark is likely enough light for fish to see, navigate and feed. So this means you can fish the nights away with no worries.