Question - Do worms eat moldy bread?

Answered by: Emily Alexander  |  Category: General  |  Last Updated: 24-08-2021  |  Views: 1326  |  Total Questions: 14

The short answer is YES, you can certainly use moldy bread – BUT it's important that we explore this “moldy” topic in greater depth. It's important to point out that the size of the worm population and the amount (and type) of food wastes being added can have a major impact on mold growth. Answer: You can add moldy food (vegetables and fruits only) to a backyard composting bin anytime. Mold cells are just one of the many different types of microorganisms that take care of decomposition and are fine in a backyard bin. If you're using a worm bin, you have to be a bit more careful. Yes, stale or moldy bread can be used in compost piles. Bread would be considered a green compost matter (source of nitrogen). Bread can attract pests and rodents so make sure the bread is well mixed into the compost pile. You can also speed up the composting process by tearing the bread into smaller pieces. Mold is not directly harmful to the worms. In fact the worms need the mold to break down the food waste. The worms then eat the mold itself and the smaller pieces of food matter. Fruit and vegie scraps, teabags and coffee grounds, crushed eggshells, small amounts of bread or pasta, moist cardboard and newspaper. you're not overfeeding your worms. Uneaten food will begin to smell and attract unwanted pests. This means you can feed your worm farm a few handfuls every few days.

https://thesquirmfirm.com/red-worms-eat-bananas/

Do red worms eat bananas? Bananas are a great and inexpensive snack for both us and our worms. Those peels are desirable to compost worms no matter what shape they're in. Avoid putting them in whole as the fruit will likely go sour in the amount of time it takes the worms to get through the skin.

https://homeguides.sfgate.com/worms-eat-mushrooms-86307.html

Worms eat organic material including dead leaves, lawn clippings, fruits, vegetables and fungi such as mushrooms. They have hard time, however, digesting meats or fats.

https://thesquirmfirm.com/can-composting-worms-eat-potatoes/

As a member of the nightshade family, potatoes are relatively high in solanine. Solanine is a toxin that acts as a pesticide. So, it should come as no surprise that compost worms avoid the potato peels they're served. However, like all organic matter, potatoes will eventually break down and become transformed.

https://wormfarmguru.com/worm-bin-bedding/

Here's a list of common bedding materials you can add into the worm bin. Brown cardboard (cut into small pieces) Paper (not bleached white office paper, shredded) Newspaper (not colored, shredded) Aged compost. Aged horse or cow manure. Coco coir or coco fiber. Peat moss. Straw and hay.

https://www.kiama.nsw.gov.au/environment/sustainability/sustainable-gardening/worm-farms/worm-farmin

What do I feed my worms? Fruit peelings (watermelon, banana, mango, peach, nectarine, pear and grapes, apple cores) NO CITRUS – too acidic.

https://donotdisturbgardening.com/can-i-put-moldy-food-in-my-compost-or-worm-bin/

It is not recommended to add moldy food to the compost pile just anywhere. Add moldy foods to the center of the compost pile and on top of brown, dried material like hay, leaves or grass clippings. This is useful because the center of the pile heats up more quickly, meaning your moldy food will decompose more quickly.

https://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/archives/parsons/publications/worm/worm.html

After worms are added, bedding should be kept moist but not soggy and the top 6 to 8 inches turned every 7 to 10 days to keep it loose. About every 6 to 9 months the old bedding should be replaced with properly prepared new bedding. To change bedding, remove the top 5 or 6 inches (where most of the worms are).

https://www.hungrybin.co.nz/instructions/feeding/

Avoid feeding the worms large quantities of meat, citrus, onions and dairy foods. Some processed food also contains preservatives, which discourage the worms from eating it. These foods won't harm your worms, but they will avoid them and those scraps will break down and rot in the bin.

https://naturesfootprint.com/community/articles/worm-bin-temperature/

Red wiggler worms thrive in temperatures between 55° and 75° Fahrenheit (12° to 24° Celsius). They will slow down reproduction and feeding in extreme heat or cold, and can even die if the temperatures get too extreme.

https://unclejimswormfarm.com/what-do-i-do-if-my-worms-are-sick/

If you notice that some your worms are dead, act quickly to save the remaining worms with these steps: Move worms to a new, clean bin. Even if you don't have another designated worm bin, clean and use whatever container you have on hand. In the future, keep another bin around in case of emergency.

https://www.reddit.com/r/Vermiculture/comments/76g6f6/what_happens_to_dead_worms/

That's a taboo, worms don't like to talk about it. Seriously though, they seem to decompose very fast. Way faster than most of the food scraps in the bin. So we don't "see" (at least I don't) worms eating dead worms, because the latter are already unrecognizable as worms.

http://cssf.usc.edu/History/2012/Projects/J2212.pdf

Gravel, sand, dead leaves, and potting soil were chosen for the experiment because they have different characteristics which will give a good variety. I believe that the earthworms will like dead leaves the best because it is organic matter which is a food supply.

https://study.com/academy/lesson/what-do-worms-eat-lesson-for-kids.html

Some of the things that worms eat include dead plants, live plants, dead animals, animal poo, and other microscopic animals. After they eat, they grind up and digest their food and pass the rest as waste, called castings, which go back into the soil and help plants grow and stay healthy.