Question - How do I deploy a docker container to Digitalocean?

Answered by: Harold Wright  |  Category: General  |  Last Updated: 07-09-2021  |  Views: 1294  |  Total Questions: 14

Deploy Docker containers into Digital Ocean Create a digital ocean account. Head over to https://www. digitalocean. com/ and create an account. Generate a personal access token. Create a droplet. Connect to the new droplet. Start a Machine Box service. Get the machine's IP address. Deploying Your First Docker Container Step 1 - Running A Container. The first task is to identify the name of the Docker Image which is configured to run Redis. Step 2 - Finding Running Containers. Step 3 - Accessing Redis. Step 4 - Accessing Redis. Step 5 - Persisting Data. Step 6 - Running A Container In The Foreground. How to Create a Docker Image From a Container Step 1: Create a Base Container. Let's get started by creating a running container. Step 2: Inspect Images. Step 3: Inspect Containers. Step 4: Start the Container. Step 5: Modify the Running Container. Step 6: Create an Image From a Container. Step 7: Tag the Image. Step 8: Create Images With Tags. Amazon Web Services (AWS) AWS is the biggest cloud-hosting service on the planet and offers support for Docker across most of its standard EC2 machines. AWS then offers the EC2 container service (ECS) that exposes a set of API calls for managing containers installed across your EC2 instances. Use Docker as version control system for your entire app's operating system. Use Docker when you want to distribute/collaborate on your app's operating system with a team. Use Docker to run your code on your laptop in the same environment as you have on your server (try the building tool)

https://searchitoperations.techtarget.com/definition/Docker-image

A Docker image is a file, comprised of multiple layers, that is used to execute code in a Docker container. An image is essentially built from the instructions for a complete and executable version of an application, which relies on the host OS kernel.

https://devopscon.io/blog/docker/docker-vs-virtual-machine-where-are-the-differences/

Docker is container based technology and containers are just user space of the operating system. In Docker, the containers running share the host OS kernel. A Virtual Machine, on the other hand, is not based on container technology. They are made up of user space plus kernel space of an operating system.

https://devopscube.com/what-is-docker/

Docker is basically a container engine which uses the Linux Kernel features like namespaces and control groups to create containers on top of an operating system and automates application deployment on the container. It provides a lightweight environment to run your application code.

https://www.freecodecamp.org/news/docker-simplified-96639a35ff36/

In simple terms, Docker is a software platform that simplifies the process of building, running, managing and distributing applications. It does this by virtualizing the operating system of the computer on which it is installed and running. The first edition of Docker was released in 2013.

https://www.sumologic.com/blog/kubernetes-vs-docker/

As Kubernetes is a container orchestrator, it needs a container runtime in order to orchestrate. Kubernetes is most commonly used with Docker, but it can also be used with any container runtime. RunC, cri-o, containerd are other container runtimes that you can deploy with Kubernetes.

http://jasonwilder.com/blog/2014/10/13/a-simple-way-to-dockerize-applications/

Dockerizing an application is the process of converting an application to run within a Docker container. While dockerizing most applications is straight-forward, there are a few problems that need to be worked around each time. Making an application use environment variables when it relies on configuration files.

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/43408493/what-is-the-difference-between-docker-service-and-docke

Docker service: Docker service will be the image for a microservice within the context of some larger application. Examples of services might include an HTTP server, a database, or any other type of executable program that you wish to run in a distributed environment.

https://read.iopipe.com/how-far-out-is-aws-fargate-a2409d2f9bc7

AWS Fargate is a compute engine for Amazon ECS that allows you to run containers without having to manage servers or clusters. With AWS Fargate, you no longer have to provision, configure, and scale clusters of virtual machines to run containers.

https://nickjanetakis.com/blog/understanding-how-the-docker-daemon-and-docker-cli-work-together

The Docker daemon is a service that runs on your host operating system. It currently only runs on Linux because it depends on a number of Linux kernel features, but there are a few ways to run Docker on MacOS and Windows too. The Docker daemon itself exposes a REST API.

https://www.freecodecamp.org/news/a-beginner-friendly-introduction-to-containers-vms-and-docker-79a9

Container. Unlike a VM which provides hardware virtualization, a container provides operating-system-level virtualization by abstracting the “user space”. Each container gets its own isolated user space to allow multiple containers to run on a single host machine.

https://codefresh.io/docker-tutorial/docker-machine-basics/

A Docker host is a physical computer system or virtual machine running Linux. This can be your laptop, server or virtual machine in your data center, or computing resource provided by a cloud provider. The component on the host that does the work of building and running containers is the Docker Daemon.

https://www.codementor.io/blog/docker-technology-5x1kilcbow

Docker uses the union file system to create and layer Docker images. For example, RUN apt install curl creates a new image. Under the hood, it allows files and directories of separate file systems, known as branches, to be transparently overlaid, forming a single coherent file system.

https://windsock.io/the-docker-proxy/

The docker-proxy is the same binary as the Docker daemon and Docker client, which the Docker daemon 'reexecs' when it is required. A Docker host makes significant use of netfilter rules to aid NAT, and to control access to the containers it hosts, and the docker-proxy mechanism isn't always required.

https://boxboat.com/2018/12/07/docker-ce-vs-docker-ee/

Docker CE is a free and open source containerization platform. Docker EE is an integrated, fully supported, and certified container platform that runs on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES), Oracle Linux, Ubuntu, Windows Server 2016, as well as Azure and AWS.