Question - How do I get rid of mites on my cactus?

Answered by: Harry Jenkins  |  Category: General  |  Last Updated: 24-06-2022  |  Views: 1003  |  Total Questions: 14

Insecticidal soap and keeping the plant area high in humidity by misting will retard the mite population. Also, chemical control with the aid of products known as acaricides will help. To really get a handle on the mites, inspect the succulents frequently so you can take action before the infestation gets out of hand. Spider mites are awful little pests. Luckily, you can control them just as you would mealybugs. You've already got a soap and organic pesticide regimen, but I would also suggest using alcohol. Try spraying 70% isopropyl alcohol, straight out of the bottle, not mixed with any water, onto your plants. Wash and wipe indoor houseplants regularly. You can use either plain water or a solution of tepid (cool-warm) water mixed with a very mild dish detergent or soap. Use a sponge soaked in the water to wipe down individual leaves of the plant, or place the water in a spray bottle and spritz the underside of the leaves. Put a few drops of soap such as dish soap in 1-2 cups of water with about 1 teaspoon of vegetable oil and mix well. Spray onto the infested areas where you see the bugs. Neem oil have been effective for some people in treating aphids. Dilute 1 tablespoon or 15 ml of neem oil in 8 cups of water and mix well. The best way to get rid of spider mites is with a hose. Attach a nozzle that will give you a strong spray and spray your plants, especially the undersides of the leaves. This knocks the mites off the leaves. You can do something similar for your houseplants.

https://www.epicgardening.com/spider-mites/

A: Honestly, mites are so tiny that you might be carrying them into your garden or indoor grow room yourself. They can ride in on your skin, your shoes, your clothes. Your dog or cat might have mites on them. But the most common source for spider mites is actually live plants.

https://citybugs.tamu.edu/factsheets/biting-stinging/others/ent-3009/

Sprays and aerosols containing syngergized pyrethrins should kill mites immediately on contact, though the treatment will only remain effective for up to a few hours. Insecticide sprays containing permethrin or bifenthrin are effective against many mites and should retain their killing properties for several weeks.

https://homeguides.sfgate.com/use-dish-soap-spider-mites-99718.html

A few spider mites won't cause stress for a healthy plant, but it's best to get rid of the pests before their infestation spreads. Spoon 2 tablespoons of a mild, liquid, non-detergent, non-degreaser dish soap into a 1-gallon jar. Allow the dish soap-water mixture to sit on the sprayed leaves for two to three hours.

https://www.wikihow.com/Get-Rid-of-Clover-Mites

Spray the clover mites with insecticide to kill them. To kill a group of mites, spray them with an indoor-safe insecticide like permethrin, diazinon, bifenthrin, or chlorpyrifos. Make sure you apply the insecticide directly to the mites. Repeat the process as necessary until the mites are gone.

https://www.colonialpest.com/spider-mites-can-infest-your-houseplants/

Spider mites don't travel much; they rarely leave the plant they're feeding on. They can, however, infest other plants indoors, particularly if the plants are touching. Mites can also drop from the plant and crawl to new plants.

https://www.joyusgarden.com/plant-pests-spider-mites-whiteflies/

Here's what I've used to control a mild infestation of spider mites: Mix 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar (white vinegar is fine too) with 1 cup of water, 1 t of baking soda & a few drops of mild dish soap into a spray bottle.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/pests/insects/spider-mite-treatment.htm

It is very difficult to see spider mites on houseplants and outdoor plants with the naked eye because they are so small, but if you suspect that your plant has spider mites, you can hold a piece of paper under the leaves of the plant and shake them gently.

https://www.wikihow.com/Get-Rid-of-Red-Spider-Mites-Organically

Soap sprays are a common, natural way to kill spider mites. Combine two tablespoons of gentle soap, one to two tablespoons of cooking oil, and a gallon of water. Spray plants thoroughly, repeating every four to seven days until spider mites appear gone.

https://homeguides.sfgate.com/ratio-water-dawn-liquid-detergent-making-insect-repellent-82232.html

Dawn liquid dish detergent in approximately a 2 percent concentration is a fairly safe alternative to commercial insecticidal soaps formulated to kill insects such as aphids, mites and scale on plants and keep them away.

https://homeguides.sfgate.com/soapy-spray-rid-mealybugs-plants-28835.html

Dry dish soap and laundry detergent contain chemicals that are harmful to plants, so avoid using these when making a soap spray. To make a soap spray for controlling mealybugs on plants, mix 2 teaspoons of mild liquid dish detergent in 1 quart of water.

https://getbusygardening.com/how-to-kill-mealybugs/

Mealybugs can live in the soil of a houseplant, so if a plant is plagued by recurring infestations, you could try removing the top inch of dirt from the pot and replacing it with fresh potting soil.

https://homeguides.sfgate.com/use-hydrogen-peroxide-kill-bugs-plant-soil-91189.html

Soak the soil surface around plants with the hydrogen peroxide spray. Spray the area once per day for one week to control pests. The hydrogen peroxide will not kill eggs, so you may need to repeat the treatment weekly to remove all the bugs.

https://leafandclay.co/blogs/blog/all-about-mealybugs

So what the heck are mealybugs? They are a really common houseplant pest. They come from warmer climates and can come into your home (or outdoor plants) by bringing home infested plants from a nursery. They spread from plant to plant and feed off of growth points.

https://wimastergardener.org/article/mealybugs/

Mealybugs can easily crawl from one plant to another, especially when leaves or branches overlap, so one contaminated plant could spread mealybugs to all your houseplants. Check under leaves, in new leaf folds, and around the growing tips for signs of infestation.