Question - How far is Alcatraz to San Francisco?

Answered by: Steven Carter  |  Category: General  |  Last Updated: 26-06-2022  |  Views: 1320  |  Total Questions: 14

1. We were among a group of 10 swimmers braving the swirling waters and strong currents of the San Francisco Bay on a one-and-a-half mile (2. 4km) open-water swim from the notorious Alcatraz Island to the mainland. We turned and started swimming. 1. 60 degrees Fahrenheit

http://www.notfrisco2.com/alcatraz/faq/faq1.html

Prison folklore had it that the waters around Alcatraz were infested by sharks. Those drawn down by the undertow may well have ended up, however, not only as a meal for these small sharks but also for bat rays, crabs, and other local sea life.

https://www.nydailynews.com/sports/more-sports/men-break-world-record-crossing-alcatraz-channel-1-00

The difficult swim from Alcatraz Island to San Francisco is familiar territory for open water swimmers Gary Emich and Steven Hurwitz. The Bay Area swimmers' 1, 000th Alcatraz crossing broke an official world record on Tuesday. The temperature in the Bay was about 54 degrees when Emich and Hurwitz dove in.

https://www.mercurynews.com/2009/11/03/great-white-sharks-at-times-enter-san-francisco-bay-2/

There are nearly a dozen species of sharks known to live in the bay, including leopard, sevengill and other, mostly docile bottom-dwelling varieties. “You can't see your dinner in San Francisco Bay. ” Contrary to sensationalism from Hollywood films, attacks by white sharks are rare.

https://www.quora.com/Are-or-were-the-waters-around-Alcatraz-really-shark-infested

Yes there are species of bottom dwelling sharks like the Leopard Shark and Sand sharks in the bay - completely harmless to humans. The great whites are near the Farallon islands about 35 miles west of the Golden Gate Bridge. The great whites are near the Farallon islands about 35 miles west of the Golden Gate Bridge.

https://waterworldswim.com/anatomy-of-the-bay-7-bites-of-san-francisco-bay-history-science-lore/

With that said though, the water surrounding Alcatraz is on the deeper end of the scale, but still, it's just an average depth of 43 feet.

http://rhorii.com/BABP/bestswim.htm

China Beach, San Francisco: This is the only San Francisco Beach outside the Golden Gate that is suitable for swimming, if you don't mind cold water. The beach is a popular launching area for wind surfers. Intrepid swimmers brave the cold waters of the Bay.

https://www.alcatrazcruises.com/plan-your-trip/weather/

Alcatraz Island sits in the middle of San Francisco Bay just east of the Golden Gate; the natural gateway to the Pacific Ocean. It almost never snows on the Island, but winters can be wet and cold. Afternoon winds are common during every season. Rain occurs frequently during winter and early spring.

https://www.quora.com/Why-are-San-Francisco-summers-so-cold

San Francisco has the coldest mean temperatures for June, July, and August among the top 50 U. S. cities. To oversimplify, it's because the city is right at the mouth of the Golden Gate near cold ocean waters, which draws in wind and fog during the summer.

https://www.inside-guide-to-san-francisco-tourism.com/beaches-in-san-francisco.html

Beaches in San Francisco are great for walking, surfing or just enjoying the view, but there is a serious danger lurking in the water that visitors should be aware of. And it's not the Great White Sharks! Almost every year, people drown at Ocean Beach, and most of those deaths could have been prevented.

https://www.howitworksdaily.com/why-was-alcatraz-so-hard-to-escape-from/

Why was Alcatraz so hard to escape from? This meant that any escape either had to involve a plane, boat or a long, hard swim. The water can often drop to 16 degrees C (60 degrees F) and the currents will slosh you about furiously, meaning you're in for a rough ride.

https://www.quora.com/What-is-it-like-to-swim-from-Alcatraz-to-shore

Purists will say that only the fist two are "true" Alcatraz swims since they both end inside Aquatic Park and that it's more difficult because the tides must timed correctly to accomplish the swim.

https://sfist.com/2017/02/22/bay_pollutants_brown/

The brown in the Bay Waters is largely a plume of sediment, the raw material necessary to rebuild wetlands and maintain their health. That sediment, though, is mixed up with pollutants — toxic mercury from old mines, Lester McKee, a scientist with the San Francisco Estuary Institute tells News Group.