Question - How is Indian corn different from sweet corn?

Answered by: Diana Ramirez  |  Category: General  |  Last Updated: 26-06-2022  |  Views: 1087  |  Total Questions: 13

Unlike the typical niblets or corn on the cob that you serve at mealtime, Indian corn isn't sweet. It's also got a pretty starchy texture when it's cooked. You could compare it to hominy, which is used to make grits. Indian corn can be ground to make flour, or the whole kernel can be reserved for popcorn. The hard, multicolored ears of corn that decorate tabletops and front doors around this time of year are, in theory, edible. They're generally ground into cornmeal and eaten in the form of tacos, corn chips, and so on. (See some Chowhound recommendations for blue corn. The squirrels and birds will love this one. To make it, just cut ears of Indian corn in half and poke a hold through the center of each cob piece. I always knew it as Indian corn, but this year I wondered if that was politically correct or even accurate. It would more accurately be called flint corn (Zea mays var. indurata) and sometimes as calico corn. It is a variant of maize, the same species as common corn. Bring the water to a boil over medium heat. Add the peeled corn on the cob. Cover and return to a boil. Cook for 5-7 minutes.

https://www.quora.com/Why-corn-on-the-cob-is-expensive-considering-corn-in-general-is-so-cheap-that-

Corn on the cob is a seasonal crop susceptible to spoilage and the cob gives it a high bulk in shipping making the shipping cost per unit high. This makes for a more expensive product in the grocery compared to something like corn meal.

https://homeguides.sfgate.com/much-corn-one-corn-plant-produce-48941.html

General Quantities. One corn plant, given adequate growing conditions, will produce between two and four ears of corn. Early varieties produce fewer, while later-maturing types produce slightly more.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Field_corn

Although not grown primarily for human consumption, people do pick ears of field corn when its sugar content has peaked and cook it on the cob or eat it raw. Ears of field corn picked and consumed in this manner are commonly called "roasting ears" due to the most commonly used method of cooking them.

https://www.farmwifecooks.com/difference-between-sweet-corn-field-corn/

When the field corn has dried down, it gets a noticeable dent at the top of the kernal. Another difference between the two is the color of the kernal, sweet corn is usually more yellow while field corn has more of an orange tint.

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/is-corn-good-for-you

Corn is rich in fiber and plant compounds that may aid digestive and eye health. Yet, it's high in starch, can spike blood sugar and may prevent weight loss when consumed in excess. The safety of genetically modified corn may also be a concern. Still, in moderation, corn can be part of a healthy diet.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corn_flakes

Corn flakes. Corn flakes, or cornflakes, is a breakfast cereal made by toasting flakes of corn (maize). The cereal was created by William Kellogg in 1894 for his brother John Kellogg. The breakfast cereal proved popular among the patients, but Will Kellogg wanted to add sugar to increase the popularity.

https://difference.guru/difference-between-white-corn-and-yellow-corn/

The endosperm is the nutritive tissue that encloses the embryo in the seed giving the corn kernels its color. The kernels and the milk of the white corn are both creamy white. This is the most common color of corn. White corn has a high percentage of sugar and water in its kernels, making it sweet and juicy.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/corn/growing-ornamental-corn.htm

Ornamental corn seeds should be planted after soil temps have reached 55-60 F. (13-16 C. ) and in most areas between May 15 to May 25 for a September harvest. Sow the ornamental corn plant seeds to a depth of 1-2 inches deep and 8-10 inches apart for small eared varieties and 10-12 inches apart for large eared.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flint_corn

Flint corn (Zea mays var. indurata; also known as Indian corn or sometimes calico corn) is a variant of maize, the same species as common corn. Because each kernel has a hard outer layer to protect the soft endosperm, it is likened to being hard as flint; hence the name.

https://recipes.howstuffworks.com/everything-about-indian-corn.htm

If you're growing Indian corn for ornamental use, be sure to wait until the husks are no longer green to pick them, then let the ears dry for about a week. Once that's done, you can store them at room temperature for four to six months.

https://eatyourwayclean.com/can-you-eat-indian-corn-yes-and-heres-how/

How to Use Indian Corn? The corn seeds need to be chucked or “popped” from the corn cob itself. Then they can be used directly for popping or ground to make masa. Then the masa, or corn meal, can be used for a great variety of dishes including grits, polenta, masa cakes, tamales, papusas or gorditas.

https://www.history.com/news/indian-corn-a-fall-favorite

Indian Corn: A Fall Favorite. Flint corn, or Indian corn, those ears with the multicolored kernels, crops up in all sorts of fall decorations. A symbol of harvest season, they crop up every fall— those ears of corn with multicolored kernels that adorn doors and grace centerpieces.