Question - Is water softening necessary?

Answered by: Gerald Smith  |  Category: General  |  Last Updated: 21-06-2022  |  Views: 887  |  Total Questions: 13

If so, you might need a water softener. Water softening systems will help to increase the lifespan of your plumbing and your clothes, as well as reducing your budget. Basically, water softeners take out extra calcium and magnesium ions using an exchange with sodium or potassium ions. 7 – Water softeners cost a lot of money. Putting a water softener in your home will require an initial investment. However, it will save you quite a bit of your hard earned money in the long run. Yes, your water softener will use electricity, you'll have to buy salt, and it will need to be serviced on occasion. Cleaner and shinier silverware, glassware, mirrors, tiles, cars, or any plumbing fixtures. Softer skin and clean, smooth hair. Reduced soap curd makes cleaning easier and reduces housework. Uses less soap and shampoo because of the rich lather softened water and soap produces. The decision to soften is a personal choice that can affect your home and the environment. If your water's hardness is greater than 7 grains per gallon or 120 mg/L, then you might need a water softener to ensure your appliances run well and to improve the taste, smell, or look of your water. When there's no salt left at all, your system will be attempting to recharge the media with raw water instead. This has no effect on the media, so hardness minerals will start creeping back into the water you're using throughout your home.

https://greenlivingguy.com/2014/02/why-water-softeners-are-harmful-to-the-environment/

They're Bad for Your Area The salt in your softened water may go to irrigate local parks or crops, thus endangering the plants. Softened water has even more far-reaching effects. Particularly in areas where water softeners are very common, cities must treat wastewater to reduce the amount of salt in it.

https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/uk/consumer-advice/a532186/hard-fact-about-water-softening/

Despite over 60% of homes being supplied with hard water only about 3% of households have a water softener fitted. They are quite expensive but worth the investment as softened water does offer some significant benefits. Softened water feels silkier and makes hair softer and easier to manage.

https://blog.hafermanwater.com/how-long-do-water-softeners-last

How Long Do Water Softeners Last? Water softeners can last 10 to 20 years, depending on the type and quality you buy. On average, a single tank electric water softener could last you up to 12 years, while a Kinetico system can last as many as 20 years.

https://www.discountwatersofteners.com/water-softener-systems-whats-the-difference/

The difference between a water softener and a water conditioner is that the conditioner will alter hard water minerals, but doesn't remove them. A water conditioner will reduce scale but a water softener will eliminate scale from calcium and magnesium by using salt in the regeneration cycle.

https://www.reynoldswater.com/blog/uncategorized/how-to-make-softened-water-drinkable-too-much-sodiu

To reduce water hardness, some people use osmosis water filters, which eliminate most of the minerals present in hard water. Some places have predominantly hard water sources, and in such places, using a water softener outright is not a reliable way to make drinking water with a suitable sodium content.

https://www.pelicanwater.com/blog/tired-of-buying-salt-bags-water-softener-alternatives-that-wont-br

That's right – there are affordable alternatives to salt-based water softener technology. The Pelican Water Wwater softener alternatives with salt free technology is the ultimate alternative to traditional salt-based units. It is the only water softener alternative certified to prevent scale buildup at a rate of 99. 6%.

https://homewater101.com/myth-water-softeners-waste-energy-money

In fact, a water softener doesn't use as much energy as you might expect. The energy required to run a water softener over the course of one year is the same as what an alarm clock uses in a year, which is about 70 kWh, or less than $10 per year based on US average energy rates (and without that annoying beep).

https://www.harveywatersofteners.co.uk/blog/health-effects-drinking-softened-water

However, there has been no official verdict to state that drinking softened water is a problem and softened water is considered safe to drink. Areas with especially hard water will require more salt to soften the water, and therefore the softened water contains higher sodium levels.

https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/hardness-water

Measures of water hardness General guidelines for classification of waters are: 0 to 60 mg/L (milligrams per liter) as calcium carbonate is classified as soft; 61 to 120 mg/L as moderately hard; 121 to 180 mg/L as hard; and more than 180 mg/L as very hard.

https://www.discountwatersofteners.com/water-softener-sizing/

Determine the proper water softener based on your hardness and number of people in your house. Hardness in Grains Per Gallon 1 to 2 people* 3 to 4 people* 5-10 GPG 32, 000 Grain 32, 000 Grain 11-20 GPG 32, 000 Grain 32, 000 Grain 21-30 GPG 32, 000 Grain 40, 000 Grain 31-40 GPG 40, 000 Grain 64, 000 Grain

https://www.punctualplumberdallas.com/blog/extending-the-life-of-your-water-softener/

If your water softener is too big for your home, it won't do enough work to trigger regeneration on time. When a water softener doesn't regenerate, it's not as effective and bacteria can grow in the tank. You can also check how much water you use against the capacity rate of your softener.

https://cdn.ymaws.com/www.rfmaonline.com/resource/resmgr/crfp/howtomeasurethehardnesswater.pdf

You can take a water sample to a water test lab to have its hardness measures. You can convert among water hardness measures. Water with hardness of 25 ppm = 25 mg. of hardness-causing minerals per liter of water.

https://www.lowes.com/n/buying-guide/water-softener-buying-guide

To determine the appropriate water softener size for your home, multiply the number of people in your home by the gallons of water they use each day (80 gallons per person is the average). Multiply that number by the grains of hardness in your water to figure out how many grains need to be removed each day.