Question - What are sleep spindles in psychology?

Answered by: Virginia Rivera  |  Category: General  |  Last Updated: 16-06-2022  |  Views: 872  |  Total Questions: 14

Sleep spindles are sudden bursts of oscillatory brain activity generated in the reticular nucleus of the thalamus that occur during stage 2 of light sleep. These brainwaves are called sleep spindles because of how they look when printed out on an EEG reading. Sleep Spindles and Sleep Cycles The thalamus, one of the prime generators of sleep spindles in the brain, is also involved in regulating our sleep. It makes sense, then, that scientists have found that sleep spindles signal greater activity in the parts of the thalamus that help us resist external stimuli. Classical sleep spindles do not occur in prematures. They first appear clearly in the EEG during slow wave sleep from the 4th week postterm (44 weeks conceptional age) and are normally present in all infants' EEGs by 9 weeks postterm. Sleep spindles signal processes that refresh our memories. Sleep spindles are brief bursts of fast activity that appear something like the shape of an "eye" as they rapidly increase in amplitude and then rapidly decay. Stage 2 is where we spend the majority of the night while sleeping. One way is to spend the day learning, according to a 2002 German study. Subjects who spent time before sleep in a learning activity had more spindles, especially early in their sleep cycle, than those who had spent the previous minutes vegetating. Sleeping pills may help.

https://www.tuck.com/sleep-spindles/

Sleep spindles are sudden bursts of oscillatory brain activity generated in the reticular nucleus of the thalamus that occur during stage 2 of light sleep. In the brain the thalamic and corticothalamic networks are involved with the electrical activity that produce a spindle on an EEG.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep_spindle

Spindles play an essential role in both sensory processing and long term memory consolidation because they are generated in the TRN. During sleep, these spindles are seen in the brain as a burst of activity immediately following muscle twitching.

https://ouraring.com/stages-of-sleep/

There are 5 stages of sleep that follow each other in a cyclical fashion: wake, relaxed wakefulness, light sleep, deep sleep and REM sleep. After reading this article, you'll have a basic understanding of the sleep stages, what happens during them and how they affect you during the day.

https://www.ninds.nih.gov/Disorders/Patient-Caregiver-Education/Understanding-Sleep

Sleep Stages Stage 1 non-REM sleep is the changeover from wakefulness to sleep. Stage 2 non-REM sleep is a period of light sleep before you enter deeper sleep. Stage 3 non-REM sleep is the period of deep sleep that you need to feel refreshed in the morning. REM sleep first occurs about 90 minutes after falling asleep.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spindle_(textiles)

Once a length of yarn or thread is spun it is wound around the spindle shaft or whorl to form a cop or a ball. As more yarn or thread is spun this makes the spindle heavier and more center-weighted, which has an effect on the momentum of the spindle.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parasomnia

Parasomnias are a category of sleep disorders that involve abnormal movements, behaviors, emotions, perceptions, and dreams that occur while falling asleep, sleeping, between sleep stages, or during arousal from sleep.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypnagogia

Hypnagogia, also referred to as "hypnagogic hallucinations", is the experience of the transitional state from wakefulness to sleep: the hypnagogic state of consciousness, during the onset of sleep (for the transitional state from sleep to wakefulness see hypnopompic).

https://bedjet.com/blogs/sleep-blog/5-stages-of-sleep

During stage two, eye movement stops and brain waves slow with the occasional burst of waves called sleep spindles. Stage two can also be characterized by the unstructured periods that alternate between muscle tone and muscle relaxation.

https://sleep.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s41606-017-0014-7

Rapid Eye Movement (REM) rebound is a polysomnographic phenomenon where a substantial increase in REM sleep is noted in patients with untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) when first undergoing continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) titration.

https://www.ninds.nih.gov/Disorders/Patient-Caregiver-Education/understanding-Sleep

Sleep Stages Stage 1 non-REM sleep is the changeover from wakefulness to sleep. Stage 2 non-REM sleep is a period of light sleep before you enter deeper sleep. Stage 3 non-REM sleep is the period of deep sleep that you need to feel refreshed in the morning. REM sleep first occurs about 90 minutes after falling asleep.

https://quizlet.com/172245371/psychology-ch-4-flash-cards/

What is a sleep spindle? A burst of oscillatory brain activity visible on an EEG that occurs during stage 2 sleep.

https://www.verywellmind.com/what-are-delta-waves-2795104

A delta wave is a type of high amplitude brain wave found in humans. These brain waves are thought to emerge from the thalamus and are generally associated with slow-wave sleep (during the third stage of sleep. ) This period of time during which delta waves occur is often known as deep sleep.

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/narcolepsy/symptoms-causes/syc-20375497

Narcolepsy is a chronic sleep disorder characterized by overwhelming daytime drowsiness and sudden attacks of sleep. People with narcolepsy often find it difficult to stay awake for long periods of time, regardless of the circumstances. Narcolepsy can cause serious disruptions in your daily routine.

https://courses.lumenlearning.com/wsu-sandbox/chapter/stages-of-sleep/

Stage 2 sleep is characterized by the appearance of both sleep spindles and K-complexes. Stage 3 and stage 4 of sleep are often referred to as deep sleep or slow-wave sleep because these stages are characterized by low frequency (up to 4 Hz), high amplitude delta waves ([link]).