Question - What are the French definite and indefinite articles?

Answered by: Larry Price  |  Category: General  |  Last Updated: 27-06-2022  |  Views: 1162  |  Total Questions: 13

The French definite articles are le for masculine nouns, la for feminine nouns, or l' when the noun begins with a vowel. Les is used for plural nouns. The French indefinite articles are une for feminine nouns, un for masculine nouns, and des for plural nouns. The French definite article has four forms: Le (masculine singular), La (feminine singular), L' (followed by a vowel), Les (plural). Which definite article to use depends on three things: the noun's gender, number, and first letter: If the noun is plural, use les. If it's a singular noun starting with a vowel or h muet, use l' If it's singular and starts with a consonant or h aspiré, use le for a masculine noun and la for a feminine noun. French has three forms of the indefinite article corresponding to the English articles "a / an" and "some". They are Un, une and des. Usage depends on the gender and number (singular, plural) of the noun. Un is used with singular masculine nouns. Unlike with definite articles, the indefinite article is only used with singular nouns and so only changes according to the gender. However, with words starting with x, y, z and the groups gn, pn, ps, sc you have to use the article uno. The article una is used for feminine singular nouns starting with a consonant.

https://frenchtogether.com/french-nouns-gender/

In French, you have a masculine “the” (le) and a feminine “the” (la). Good news – there's a plural “the” (les), but it stays the same for groups/things of either gender. Similarly, you have a masculine “a” (un) and a feminine “a” (une).

https://french.kwiziq.com/revision/glossary/article-type/french-articles-contract-in-some-instances

French Contracted Article When the French definite articles le and les are preceded by the prepositions à or de, the two words contract. à + le = au. à + les = aux. de + le = du. de + les = des.

https://learn-french.wonderhowto.com/how-to/say-what-is-your-name-and-my-name-is-french-379533/

To ask someone their name, a stranger or someone older than you, ask, "Comment vous appelez-vous? ". When asking someone your own age, it's "Comment tu t'appelles? " To answer, say "Je m'appelle" + Your Name.

https://www.quora.com/How-do-I-pronounce-Le-in-French-Some-pronounced-it-as-le-as-in-lemon-Others-pr

“Le” is most definitely luh /l? / in French, like the le in LeBron James. The leh /l? / you heard might be “les”, the plural form, whose vowel is that of bet. EDIT Actually its /le/, the vowel being the first element of the ey diphthong.

https://french.kwiziq.com/revision/grammar/using-le-la-l-to-say-the-definite-articles

French has three words for the : le, la and l'. Unlike English, all nouns (words for things) in French are masculine or feminine. Use le with masculine nouns. Use la with feminine nouns. Use l' with words of either gender that begin with a vowel or the letter h.

http://www.frenchtutorial.com/en/learn-french/basics/le_la_les

As French makes a distinction between "masculine and feminine objects", people use le for masculine things/persons and la for feminine things/persons. However, in the plural, only les is used whatever the gender is. When the following noun begins with a vowel, le or la becomes l'.

http://www.french-linguistics.co.uk/grammar/how_to_say_my_in_french.shtml

There are generally three words for my in French: mon, ma and mes. if the thing/person is masculine (le), then you generally use mon to translate 'my'; if the thing/person is feminine (la), then you generally use ma to translate 'my'; if the thing/person is plural (les), then you use mes to translate 'my'.

https://www.lawlessfrench.com/grammar/partitive-article/

The partitive article refers to an unspecified quantity of food, liquid, or some other uncountable noun. English has no equivalent article – the partitive is usually translated by the adjectives "some" or "any, " or may be left out entirely.

https://study.com/academy/lesson/definite-and-indefinite-articles-in-french.html

The French definite articles are le for masculine nouns, la for feminine nouns, or l' when the noun begins with a vowel. Les is used for plural nouns. The French indefinite articles are une for feminine nouns, un for masculine nouns, and des for plural nouns.

https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/French/Grammar/Articles

The definite article · L'article défini[edit] The definite article agrees with a specific noun in gender and number. Like other articles (indefinite, partitive) they present a noun. Unlike English, the French definite article is used also in a general sense, a general statement, or feeling about an idea or thing.

https://www.dummies.com/languages/french/how-to-express-time-in-french/

To tell a time on the hour in French, use il est + [number] + heure(s). For example: il est deux heures (it is two o'clock). Note: When it is one o'clock, say: il est une heure (it is one o'clock), using the feminine singular une instead of un because the word heure (hour) is feminine.

https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/French/Grammar/Pronouns

A pronoun replaces a noun in a sentence. Often used to prevent repeating the noun. French has six different types of subject pronouns: the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd person singular and the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd person plural. Grammar. Subject Pronouns · Les pronoms soumis.