Question - What does begonias look like?

Answered by: Patrick Miller  |  Category: General  |  Last Updated: 19-06-2022  |  Views: 584  |  Total Questions: 14

Wax begonias have succulent stems; shiny, rounded, green or reddish-brown leaves and grow in a mounded habit. They bloom with 1-1/2-inch single or double flowers in shades of red, pink, or white. Tuberous begonias come in two forms, either upright or trailing, and have green or burgundy leaves. Begonias are usually grown as bedding plants in warmer climates or potted in containers in colder regions. Identify shrub-type begonias by their upright growing habit and branching stems. Look for velvet-textured, hairy leaf surfaces to spot these little-known begonias. Know when to plant. Begonias are annuals, so they won't grow back each year. Therefore, each year you will have to replant them, typically in mid spring. Begonias don't handle cold temperatures and frost well, so wait until at least one week after the final frost of winter to plant them. Morning sun (and a little afternoon shade) is perfect. Wax begonias can tolerate more sun than other types, and the ones with bronze-colored leaves are the most sun-tolerant of all. Tuberous begonias prefer more shade and less heat, so we often see them on display in late summer. Soil: Light, rich, humusy soil. Double begonias (Roseform Pink shown below) are bushy, compact plants with big, rose-like flowers. They have an upright growth habit that works well in both containers and garden beds. The combination of attractive foliage and showy flowers makes double begonias a very popular choice for shady gardens.

TAGS: does begonias
https://www.homestratosphere.com/types-of-begonias/

Rieger begonias They come in colors that include bright red, orange, pink, white, and yellow, and if you use them as houseplants, make sure you give them a lot of sun – but not direct sunlight.

https://extension.oregonstate.edu/news/dont-toss-those-tuberous-begonias-save-next-summer

Take the following steps to save your potted tuberous begonia tubers: Remove plant from pot before hard frosts occur. Cut back most of the top of the plant, leaving the ball of roots and soil intact. Place in a dry, cool storage area (a basement or garage) and allow the tubers to cure for several weeks.

https://www.theflowerexpert.com/content/growingflowers/growingflowers/begonias

There are different types of begonias: tuberous begonias (the ones with large flowers), semperflorens begonias (the wax type), rex begonias, rhizomatus begonias (interesting leaves and flowers). There are three types of Begonias: Tuberous, Semperflorens, and the uncommon Perennials.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/begonia/begonias.htm

Generally, fibrous and rhizomatous begonias make excellent houseplants while tuberous begonias can be grown as houseplants but have a harder time surviving due to the need for higher humidity and light than the other two kinds. Begonias grown indoors are especially susceptible to root rot and overwatering.

https://living.thebump.com/retrieve-seed-begonia-plant-5967.html

Begonias have both male and female flowers and are capable of self-pollinating, but they can also pollinate with other begonia flowers in the garden, leading to hybrid seeds.

https://www.wikihow.com/Care-for-a-Begonia

Plant the tuberous begonias outside after all danger of frost has passed. Wax begonias, the familiar outdoor bedding begonia, will bloom all year if kept warm. Cane type (Angel Wing) begonias and the Rex or foliage begonias are also good indoor plants.

https://www.longfield-gardens.com/article/All-About-Begonias

Begonias grow from tuberous roots. The larger the tuber, the more growth points it will have and the more stems and flowers it will produce. Longfield Gardens offers 5/6 cm tubers, which give you larger, fuller plants than smaller, 4/5 cm tubers. Quality begonia tubers are dense and firm, not mushy or brittle.

https://www.thespruce.com/begonias-for-containers-4121751

Most are perennial plants in zones 10 and 11, but they are widely grown in almost every region as annuals. The principal appeal of begonias is that many types producte spectacular flowers in shady conditions where few flowering plants thrive.

https://homeguides.sfgate.com/begonias-need-watered-85496.html

The main rule of thumb for watering begonias is to not let the soil dry out completely. Stick your finger into the soil, and if it dry to your first knuckle, it's time to water. Avoid overwatering, which will cause the foliage to turn yellow and eventually drop.

https://homeguides.sfgate.com/make-begonias-bloom-67771.html

Following some general growing tips common to most begonias, however, probably will encourage your plants to bloom. Grow begonias in bright, indirect sunlight or dappled sunlight, preferably in an area with high humidity. Water begonias thoroughly when the top 1/2 to 1 inch of their soil feels dry.

https://homeguides.sfgate.com/deadhead-begonias-44811.html

do not require deadheading to thrive. Rather they self-clean by dropping spent flowers on their own. However, if you want to clean up your begonias a bit faster than nature does, or if you want to encourage the plant to produce more stems, you should get into the habit of deadheading.

https://homeguides.sfgate.com/grow-begonias-pots-45419.html

Begonias are tropical perennials that thrive in warmth and, typically, partial light. Tuberous begonias are suitable options for begonia container gardens as they work well with the light texture of potting mix, and they work as bedding plants, too. These types of begonias are either upright or trailing.

https://ferndalegardencentre.co.uk/growing-tuberous-begonias/

From January until late April tuberous begonias are available to buy.

https://homeguides.sfgate.com/sizes-begonia-plants-77020.html

They can grow from 6 inches to 8 feet or more. They form roots at the nodes and can spread over large areas. Thick-stemmed begonias develop treelike stems and in warm climates can grow 20 feet tall.