Question - What does the Gospel of John tell us about Jesus?

Answered by: Timothy Collins  |  Category: General  |  Last Updated: 28-06-2022  |  Views: 639  |  Total Questions: 14

The purpose of this gospel, as stated by John himself, is to show that Jesus of Nazareth was Christ, the Son of God, and that believers in him might have eternal life. In the Gospel of John, the central theme is the divine Logos, the word that was with God and that was God. It has often been called the "spiritual gospel" because of the way that it portrays Jesus. Another interesting feature of John's gospel is that Jesus speaks in long monologues, rather than pithy statements or parables. He openly proclaims his divinity and insists that the only way to the Father is through him. Matthew is at pains to place his community squarely within its Jewish heritage, and to portray a Jesus whose Jewish identity is beyond doubt. He begins by tracing Jesus' genealogy. In the words of Helmut Koester, "It is very important for Matthew that Jesus is the son of Abraham. " In short, Jesus is a Jew. John's gospel is different from the other three in the New Testament. Whereas in the three synoptic gospels Jesus actually eats a passover meal before he dies, in John's gospel he doesn't. The last supper is actually eaten before the beginning of passover. One of Luke's major concerns is to show that the work, passion, crucifixion, and resurrection of Jesus are the fulfillment of the Jewish scriptures (i. e., Moses, the prophets, and the Psalms).

https://www.cliffsnotes.com/literature/n/new-testament-of-the-bible/summary-and-analysis/the-gospel-

In the Gospel of John, the central theme is the divine Logos, the word that was with God and that was God. This Logos became flesh and dwelt among men in the person of Jesus of Nazareth. John says nothing of a supernatural birth.

https://quizlet.com/69539391/s4p1-flash-cards/

The overall message of the Gospels is that Jesus is the divine Son of God, part of the Trinity, and the path to salvation.

http://mountaineagle.com/stories/the-uniqueness-of-johns-gospel,18660?

The Gospel of John is unique from the “synoptic Gospels” (Matthew, Mark and Luke), so called due to their similar content. The synoptics cover many of the same miracles, parables and events of Jesus' life and ministry. The synoptics focus on the signs and sayings of Christ; John emphasizes the identity of Christ.

https://www.britannica.com/topic/Gospel-According-to-John

John's is the only one of the four not considered among the Synoptic Gospels (i. e., those presenting a common view). Although the Gospel is ostensibly written by St. John the Apostle, “the beloved disciple” of Jesus, there has been considerable discussion of the actual identity of the author.

https://www.bloomsbury.com/us/portraits-of-jesus-in-the-gospel-of-john-9780567675125/

About Portraits of Jesus in the Gospel of John John's Gospel is best known for its presentation of Jesus as the Word of God made flesh. But as the narrative unfolds, readers discover that the identity of Jesus is surprisingly complex. He is depicted as a teacher, a healer, a prophet, and Messiah.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Names_and_titles_of_Jesus_in_the_New_Testament

Logos (the Word) John 1:1-18 calls Jesus the Logos (Greek λόγος), often used as "the Word" in English translations.

https://www.britannica.com/topic/Gospel-According-to-Mark

Mark's Gospel stresses the deeds, strength, and determination of Jesus in overcoming evil forces and defying the power of imperial Rome. Mark also emphasizes the Passion, predicting it as early as chapter 8 and devoting the final third of his Gospel (11–16) to the last week of Jesus' life.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parables_of_Jesus

Canonical gospels The three synoptic gospels contain the parables of Jesus. There are a growing number of scholars who also find parables in the Gospel of John, such as the little stories of the Good Shepherd (John 10:1–5) or the childbearing woman (John 16:21). Otherwise, John includes allegories but no parables.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_Evangelists

The gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke are known as the Synoptic Gospels, because they include many of the same stories, often in the same sequence. Mark – a follower of Peter and so an "apostolic man, " Luke – a doctor who wrote what is now the book of Luke to Theophilus.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_1:1

John 1:1 is the first verse in the opening chapter of the Gospel of John. In the Douay–Rheims, King James, New International, and other versions of the Bible, the verse reads: In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gospel_of_Thomas

Many scholars consider the Gospel of Thomas to be a gnostic text, since it was found in a library among others, it contains Gnostic themes, and perhaps presupposes a Gnostic worldview. Others reject this interpretation, because Thomas lacks the full-blown mythology of Gnosticism as described by Irenaeus of Lyons (ca.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synoptic_Gospels

The gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke are referred to as the synoptic Gospels because they include many of the same stories, often in a similar sequence and in similar or sometimes identical wording. They stand in contrast to John, whose content is largely distinct.