Question - What does the septum pellucidum do?

Answered by: Chris Brown  |  Category: General  |  Last Updated: 16-06-2022  |  Views: 1387  |  Total Questions: 14

The septum pellucidum acts as a partition between a portion of the lateral ventricles, forming part of the walls of the anterior region of the lateral ventricles. It is made up of a thin two-layered structure that consists of white matter, some neurons, fiber bundles, and blood vessels. The absence of the septum pellucidum is a rare condition that affects the structure of the brain. Specifically, a thin membrane called the septum pellucidum is missing from its normal position in the middle of the brain. Diagnosis of absence of the septum pellucidum can be made through imaging such as an MRI. The septum pellucidum (Latin for "translucent wall") is a thin, triangular, vertical double membrane separating the anterior horns of the left and right lateral ventricles of the brain. In post-natal life, the laminae of the septum pellucidum usually fuse, which obliterates the cavum. The cavity contains cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that filters from the ventricles through the septal laminae. Cavum septi pellucidi (CSP) is an important landmark in the prenatal ultrasound evaluation of the fetal brain, and is a marker for normal central forebrain development. Examination of the fetal brain by MRI can confirm the sonographic findings and evaluate for associated anomalies.

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/318065

Very occasionally, a person will be born without a corpus callosum. This is known as agenesis of the corpus callosum, and it causes a wide variety of physical and behavioral symptoms.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9006427

Sudden death in septo-optic dysplasia. CONCLUSIONS: Children with septo-optic dysplasia and hypocortisolism are at risk for sudden death during febrile illness. Thermoregulatory disturbances and dehydration from diabetes insipidus may potentiate clinical deterioration.

https://brainmadesimple.com/corpus-callosum/

The Corpus Callosum is the part of the mind that allows communication between the two hemispheres of the brain. It is responsible for transmitting neural messages between both the right and left hemispheres.

https://www.jcgo.org/index.php/jcgo/article/view/423/270

Cavum septi pellucidi (CSP) is an important structure, developed together with the corpus callosum (CC) starting from 10 weeks gestation age (GA) until 18 weeks GA. It is located in the middle of the brain, placed above the fornix, between the two medial walls of the lateral ventricles and below the CC.

https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/septo-optic-dysplasia

Septo-optic dysplasia is a disorder of early brain development. Depending on which structures are affected, abnormal brain development can lead to intellectual disability and other neurological problems. The third major feature of this disorder is pituitary hypoplasia.

https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/diseases/7627/septo-optic-dysplasia-spectrum

Although there is no cure for this condition, the treatment is directed toward the specific symptoms in each individual. Children with possible SOD must be kept under careful hormonal follow-up, and, if present, hormone deficiencies should be treated with hormone replacement therapy.

https://www.chop.edu/conditions-diseases/septo-optic-dysplasia

Causes of septo-optic dysplasia Researchers suspect that genetic and other factors during early development may combine to trigger the onset of the condition. The other factors being studied include viral infections, certain medications, and disruption in blood flow to the fetus' brain at key stages of development.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agenesis_of_the_corpus_callosum

Causes. Agenesis of the corpus callosum is caused by disruption to development of the fetal brain between the 3rd and 12th weeks of pregnancy. In most cases, it is not possible to know what caused an individual to have ACC or another callosal disorder.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK537048/

The cavum septum pellucidum (CSP) is a potential cavity between the membranous leaves of the septum pellucidum, separated by at least 1 mm, and is considered a normal anatomical variation.

https://study.com/academy/lesson/atrioventricular-septum-definition-function-development.html

It consists of two upper chambers called the atria and two lower chambers called the ventricles. The right side of the heart pumps the blood to the lungs, while the left provides circulation to the rest of the body. A septum is described as a wall that divides some part of the body.

https://www.nature.com/articles/pr19841361

Cavum vergae is a midline cavity of the brain, posterior to the septum pellucidum which often communicates with a cavum septum pellucidum. These observations suggest that cavum vergae can be associated with neurologic dysfunction and macrocephaly.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/neuroscience/septal-nuclei

The septal region (septal nuclei), excluding the nucleus accumbens, is a small area just rostral to the anterior commissure and in the medial wall of the hemisphere (Figs. 31. 1B and 31. 9A). These nuclei extend into the base of the septum pellucidum.

https://radiopaedia.org/articles/cavum-vergae?lang=us

Cavum vergae. The cavum vergae (CV), along with the cavum septum pellucidum (CSP) that lies immediately anterior to it, is a persistence of the embryological fluid-filled space between the leaflets of the septum pellucidum and is a common anatomical variant.

https://www.neuroscientificallychallenged.com/blog/know-your-brain-septum

The septum pellucidum acts as a partition between a portion of the lateral ventricles, forming part of the walls of the anterior region of the lateral ventricles. It is made up of a thin two-layered structure that consists of white matter, some neurons, fiber bundles, and blood vessels.