Question - What drugs cause drug rash?

Answered by: Maria Roberts  |  Category: General  |  Last Updated: 16-06-2022  |  Views: 1018  |  Total Questions: 14

Almost any drug can cause a rash. But antibiotics (especially penicillins and sulfa drugs), NSAIDs, and anti-seizure drugs are the most common drugs to cause a rash. Read on to learn more about the different kinds of drug rashes and how to manage them. Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms The skin rash associated with this type of reaction looks similar to a morbilliform eruption. It is usually red, flat, and itchy, and it may cover large areas of skin. There is often swelling in the face, hands, and lymph nodes. Many people also have a fever. Common Drugs That Cause Allergies Antibiotics -- amoxicillin (Moxatag), ampicillin, penicillin (Bicillin L-A), tetracycline (Sumycin), and others. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs like ibuprofen and naproxen. Aspirin. Sulfa drugs. Chemotherapy drugs. Monoclonal antibody therapy -- cetuximab (Erbitux), rituximab (Rituxian and others. If your allergic reaction to a drug is not life-threatening, your allergist may give you: An antihistamine to counteract the allergic reaction. A nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, such as ibuprofen or aspirin, or a corticosteroid to reduce inflammation. You can usually separate a drug rash from other rashes since they tend to coincide with starting a new drug. But in some cases, it can take a drug up to two weeks to cause a rash. The rash usually disappears once you stop taking the drug.

https://www.medicinenet.com/are_skin_rashes_contagious/article.htm

Rashes that are considered by many physicians to be contagious are as follows: Molluscum contagiosum (viral) Impetigo (bacterial) Herpes (herpes simplex, types 1 and 2 viruses) Rash caused by Neisseria meningitides (N. Rash and blisters that accompany shingles (herpes zoster virus) Ringworm (fungal) infections (tinea)

https://www.rxlist.com/cocaine-side-effects-drug-center.htm

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, seek immediate medical attention if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

https://www.medicinenet.com/rash/article.htm

Common rashes include eczema, poison ivy, hives, and athlete's foot. Infections that cause rashes may be fungal, bacterial, parasitic, or viral. Over-the-counter products may be helpful treatments for many skin rashes. Rashes lasting more than a few days that are unexplained should be evaluated by a doctor.

https://www.healthline.com/health/home-remedies-for-rashes

Here are some relief measures to try, along with information about why they might work. Cold compress. One of the fastest and easiest ways to stop the pain and itch of a rash is to apply cold. Oatmeal bath. Aloe vera (fresh) Coconut oil. Tea tree oil. Baking soda. Indigo naturalis. Apple cider vinegar.

https://www.dualdiagnosis.org/drug-abuse-skin-picking/

Drug abuse affects every organ in your body — including your body's largest organ, the skin. Skin picking and hair pulling are two common reactions to the physical and psychological effects of illicit drug use. Heroin and meth use can cause direct damage to the skin in the form of needle marks and abscesses.

https://www.aad.org/itchy-skin/rash-seek-medical-treatment

Although most rashes are not life-threatening, some rashes can signal something more serious. If you have a rash and notice any of the following symptoms, see a board-certified dermatologist or go to the emergency room immediately: The rash is all over your body.

https://www.aad.org/itchy-skin/relieve-uncontrollably-itchy-skin

Itch can be a side effect of taking some medications, such as aspirin, prescription-strength pain relievers called opioids, and some blood-pressure drugs. It can also be a side effect of cancer treatment.

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/drug-allergy/symptoms-causes/syc-20371835

Drug allergy signs and symptoms may include: Skin rash. Hives. Itching. Fever. Swelling. Shortness of breath. Wheezing. Runny nose.

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/322466

The rash is not contagious and usually begins to fade after 3 days but may take up to 6 days to disappear.

https://www.healthline.com/health/itchy-skin-at-night

Along with your body's natural circadian rhythms, a number of different health conditions can cause itchy skin to become worse at night. skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis (eczema), psoriasis, and hives. bugs like scabies, lice, bed bugs, and pinworms. kidney or liver disease.

https://www.webmd.com/beauty/the-effects-of-stress-on-your-skin

For example, stress can aggravate psoriasis, rosacea, and eczema. It can also cause hives and other types of skin rashes and trigger a flare-up of fever blisters. Interfere with daily skin care. If you're stressed, you might skimp on this part of your routine, which can aggravate skin issues.

https://www.healthline.com/health/parenting/amoxicillin-rash

It looks like flat, red patches on the skin. Smaller, paler patches usually accompany the red patches on the skin. This is described as a “maculopapular rash. ” Any medication in the penicillin family, including the amoxicillin antibiotic, can lead to pretty serious rashes, including hives.

https://www.drugs.com/health-guide/medication-allergy.html

The reaction also can be delayed and not occur until 8 to 10 days after starting the drug. It is even possible to develop the rash after you have finished a one week course of medication. Symptoms that appear within hours of taking the drug — called acute symptoms — usually involve a skin rash, hives or itching.

https://topclassactions.com/lawsuit-settlements/lawsuit-news/816482-ibuprofen-hives-rash-may-be-more

In some cases, ibuprofen hives can spread as a red or purple rash, and quickly begin to blister. Skin begins to peel, falling off, and so closely resembles symptoms of a severe burn that many Stevens Johnson Syndrome patients are treated in a hospital's burn wing.