Question - When was last solar maximum?

Answered by: Dennis Martin  |  Category: General  |  Last Updated: 20-06-2022  |  Views: 841  |  Total Questions: 14

There was a solar maximum in 2000. In 2006 NASA initially expected a solar maximum in 2010 or 2011, and thought that it could be the strongest since 1958. However, the solar maximum was not declared to have occurred until 2014, and even then was ranked among the weakest on record. Solar minimum is the period of least solar activity in the 11 year solar cycle of the Sun. During this time, sunspot and solar flare activity diminishes, and often does not occur for days at a time. Solar minimum and maximum events with approximate dates. Generally speaking this occurs over a period of approximately 11 years, although it can be anything up to 14 or 15 years, and is called the Solar Cycle. During any given Solar Cycle, the number of sunspots rises to a maximum (Solar Maximum) and falls to a minimum (Solar Minimum). Lisa Upton, a solar physicist with Space Systems Research Corporation and co-chair of the panel issuing predictions, said Cycle 25 should begin between mid-2019 and late 2020 and that it should reach its maximum between 2023 and 2026, when between 95 and 130 sunspots are projected. The start of solar cycle 25 (as with any other cycle) will be determined restrospectively. Mathematically, this declaration cannot happen less than 7 months after the minimum. 11. 04. Solar Cycles “Start” (Maximum) Spotless days Solar cycle 21-22 1979-12 273 Solar cycle 22-23 1989-11 309 Solar cycle 23-24 2001-11 817

https://geology.utah.gov/map-pub/survey-notes/glad-you-asked/ice-ages-what-are-they-and-what-causes-

At least five major ice ages have occurred throughout Earth's history: the earliest was over 2 billion years ago, and the most recent one began approximately 3 million years ago and continues today (yes, we live in an ice age! ). Currently, we are in a warm interglacial that began about 11, 000 years ago.

https://www.weather.gov/news/190504-sun-activity-in-solar-cycle

The current solar cycle, Cycle 24, is declining and predicted to reach solar minimum - the period when the Sun is least active - late in 2019 or 2020. This is well below the average number of sunspots, which typically ranges from 140 to 220 sunspots per solar cycle.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greenhouse_and_icehouse_Earth

The Eocene, which occurred between 53 and 49 million years ago, was the Earth's warmest temperature period for 100 million years.

https://weather.com/news/climate/news/ice-age-climate-change-earth-glacial-interglacial-period

At a Glance. There have been five big ice ages in Earth's 4. 5-billion-year lifespan and scientists say we're due for another one. The next ice age may not occur for another 100, 000 years.

https://science.nasa.gov/science-news/news-articles/solar-minimum-is-coming

“This is called solar minimum, ” says Dean Pesnell of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD. “And it's a regular part of the sunspot cycle. ” The sun is heading toward solar minimum now. Sunspot counts were relatively high in 2014, and now they are sliding toward a low point expected in 2019-2020.

https://www.giss.nasa.gov/research/briefs/rind_03/

Our experiments show that the solar cycle influences tropospheric rainfall patterns in a manner consistent with some observations, with increased solar activity favoring precipitation north of the equator (for example, the South Asian monsoon) and decreased precipitation both near the equator and at northern mid-

https://www.space.com/2942-sun-activity-increased-century-study-confirms.html

The energy output from the Sun has increased significantly during the 20th century, according to a new study. Many studies have attempted to determine whether there is an upward trend in the average magnitude of sunspots and solar flares over time, but few firm conclusions have been reached.

https://www.cbs8.com/article/news/verify-is-the-sun-getting-stronger/509-38f63279-01cb-4688-bb35-ea2

According to Scripps Atmospheric Scientist Ray Weiss the answer is no, even though it feels that way. He says it's not that the sun is stronger, but rather the ozone layer is thinner meaning more UV rays are coming through.

https://spaceplace.nasa.gov/solar-cycles/en/

The Sun's magnetic field goes through a cycle, called the solar cycle. Every 11 years or so, the Sun's magnetic field completely flips. This means that the Sun's north and south poles switch places. Giant eruptions on the Sun, such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections, also increase during the solar cycle.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superflare

Since they can occur on stars of the same age, mass and composition as the Sun this cannot be ruled out, but no indication of solar superflares have been found for the past ten millennia.

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/ames/solar-activity-forecast-for-next-decade-favorable-for-exploration

The results show that the next cycle will start in 2020 and reach its maximum in 2025. On August 31, 2012 a long filament of solar material that had been hovering in the sun's atmosphere, the corona, erupted out into space.

https://image.gsfc.nasa.gov/poetry/ask/a11534.html

It affects it by the intense clouds of high energy particles that it often contains which are produced by solar storms. When these clouds, called coronal mass ejections, make their way to the Earth in 3-4 days, they collide with the magnetic field of the Earth and cause it to change its shape.

https://image.gsfc.nasa.gov/poetry/ask/a11467.html

Because the Sun continues to 'burn' hydrogen into helium in its core, the core slowly collapses and heats up, causing the outer layers of the Sun to grow larger. This has been going on since soon after the Sun was formed 4. 5 billion years ago.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_cycle

Solar cycles have an average duration of about 11 years. Solar maximum and solar minimum refer to periods of maximum and minimum sunspot counts.