Question - When was leukemia first discovered and how?

Answered by: Bonnie Henderson  |  Category: General  |  Last Updated: 20-06-2022  |  Views: 1411  |  Total Questions: 14

An article on June 5 about the first mention of leukemia in The New York Times described the disease's discovery imprecisely. Rudolf Virchow, who described the condition in 1845, was among the first to do so, and he gave it its name, in 1847 — but he was not the first to describe it. Alfred Velpeau defined the leukemia associated symptoms, and observed pus in the blood vessels (1825). Alfred Donné detected a maturation arrest of the white blood cells (1844). That same year, Rudolf Virchow defined a reversed white and red blood cell balance. He introduced the disease as leukämie in 1847. Leukemia develops when the DNA of developing blood cells, mainly white cells, incurs damage. This causes the blood cells to grow and divide uncontrollably. Healthy blood cells die, and new cells replace them. These develop in the bone marrow. John Hughes Bennett (Figure 3), pathologist at the Royal Infirmary Edinburgh, gave leukemia its first published recognition as a clinical entity and as a blood-related disease. He was then often referred to as the person who first discovered leukemia because his description was more complete and scientific in nature. These studies proved to be a breakthrough, and, ultimately, one-half of the patients were cured of leukemia. The idea that the cure of ALL was now possible was published in 1971 and again in 1972.

https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/kimmel_cancer_center/centers/blood_bone_marrow_cancers/about_blood_a

In a person with leukemia, for example, the bone marrow makes abnormal white blood cells, called leukemia cells. Unlike normal blood cells, leukemia cells don't die when they should. Over time, lymphoma cells may replace the normal cells in the bone marrow. Myeloma develops when the body overproduces plasma cells.

http://www.idph.state.il.us/cancer/factsheets/leukemia.htm

What is Leukemia (Blood Cancer)? Leukemia starts in the soft, inner part of the bones (bone marrow), but often moves quickly into the blood. It can then spread to other parts of the body, such as the lymph nodes, spleen, liver, central nervous system and other organs.

https://www.drugs.com/health-guide/leukemia.html

Long term survival of leukemia varies greatly, depending upon multiple factors, including type of leukemia and age of the patient. ALL: In general, the disease goes into remission in nearly all children who have it. More than four out of five children live at least five years. The prognosis for adults is not as good.

https://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/05/health/history-of-battle-against-leukemia.html

An article on June 5 about the first mention of leukemia in The New York Times described the disease's discovery imprecisely. Rudolf Virchow, who described the condition in 1845, was among the first to do so, and he gave it its name, in 1847 — but he was not the first to describe it.

https://www.healthline.com/health/leukemia-hereditary

Leukemia is a cancer of the body's bone marrow, which is where your blood cells are made. It's a genetic disease, but most cases aren't thought to be hereditary. This means that while leukemia is caused by mutations in your genes, these genetic abnormalities aren't often inherited from your family.

https://kidshealth.org/en/parents/cancer-leukemia.html

Leukemia affects adults and children. It is more common in boys than girls. The different types of leukemia affect different age groups: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is most common in children 2 to 8 years old.

https://www.webmd.com/cancer/lymphoma/understanding-leukemia-treatment

A blood test showing an abnormal white cell count may suggest the diagnosis. To confirm the diagnosis and identify the specific type of leukemia, a needle biopsy and aspiration of bone marrow from a pelvic bone will need to be done to test for leukemic cells, DNA markers, and chromosome changes in the bone marrow.

https://www.health.harvard.edu/cancer/leukemia

There are five stages of chronic lymphocytic leukemia: stage 0: too many lymphocytes in the blood but no other symptoms. stage I: lymph nodes are swollen because too many lymphocytes are being made. stage II: lymph nodes, spleen, and liver are swollen because too many lymphocytes are being made.

https://www.medicinenet.com/leukemia/article.htm

Acute leukemia needs to be treated when it is diagnosed, with the goal of inducing a remission (absence of leukemia cells in the body). Acute leukemias can often be cured with treatment. Chronic leukemias are unlikely to be cured with treatment, but treatments are often able to control the cancer and manage symptoms.

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/polycythemia-vera/symptoms-causes/syc-20355850

In rare cases, polycythemia vera can lead to other blood diseases, including a progressive disorder in which bone marrow is replaced with scar tissue, a condition in which stem cells don't mature or function properly, or cancer of the blood and bone marrow (acute leukemia).

https://www.mdedge.com/fedprac/article/160734/all/global-snapshot-leukemia-incidence

Incidence also is generally higher in males, with a global male to female ratio of 1. 4. For men, the highest regional leukemia rate – estimated at 11. 3 per 100, 000 population for 2012 – was found in Australia and New Zealand, with northern America (the United States and Canada) next at 10. 5 per 100, 000.

https://hillman.upmc.com/cancer-care/blood/types/leukemia

The four most common types of leukemia are: Acute lymphocytic leukemia. Acute myeloid leukemia. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Chronic myeloid leukemia.

https://www.hematology.org/Patients/Cancers/Leukemia.aspx

Your doctor will conduct a complete blood count (CBC) to determine if you have leukemia. This test may reveal if you have leukemic cells. Abnormal levels of white blood cells and abnormally low red blood cell or platelet counts can also indicate leukemia.

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/325332

Leukemia develops due to mutations in the DNA of bone marrow cells. It causes abnormal cell development in the blood and bone marrow. However, in most cases, these mutations occur for no known reason. Familial acute myeloid leukemia is an inherited form of acute myeloid leukemia (AML).