Question - Where do begonia bulbs grow?

Answered by: Stephen Jones  |  Category: General  |  Last Updated: 20-06-2022  |  Views: 974  |  Total Questions: 13

They are started from tubers, which many refer to as bulbs, and should be planted in early spring. Gardeners love begonias because unlike most other flowering plants, they prefer shade over sun. Once they sprout, begonias easily thrive in many different climates. Although tuberous begonias are shade-loving plants, they also require a bit of morning or late afternoon sunlight. A location in dappled or filtered light also works well, but the plants won't survive midday sun or heat. Begonias need moist, well-drained soil and are likely to rot in soggy conditions. KEEP THE TUBERS WARM AND COZY Though begonias like humidity, avoid overwatering. Wet soil can cause the tubers to rot. Once the first leaves appear, move the pots to a warm sunny windowsill or put them under grow lights. When the tubers have one or two good-size leaves, you can transplant them. Begonias are annuals, so they won't grow back each year. Therefore, each year you will have to replant them, typically in mid spring. Begonias don't handle cold temperatures and frost well, so wait until at least one week after the final frost of winter to plant them.

https://garden.org/frogs/view/11460/

Begonia tubers increase in size each year and after three years or so, the flower display will begin to deteriorate. It's best to divide the tubers in the early spring, after the buds have begun to swell. Use a sharp knife and divide into as many pieces as you like, as long as each piece has at least one bud on it.

https://homeguides.sfgate.com/deadhead-begonias-44811.html

do not require deadheading to thrive. Rather they self-clean by dropping spent flowers on their own. However, if you want to clean up your begonias a bit faster than nature does, or if you want to encourage the plant to produce more stems, you should get into the habit of deadheading.

https://homeguides.sfgate.com/make-begonias-bloom-67771.html

Following some general growing tips common to most begonias, however, probably will encourage your plants to bloom. Grow begonias in bright, indirect sunlight or dappled sunlight, preferably in an area with high humidity. Water begonias thoroughly when the top 1/2 to 1 inch of their soil feels dry.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/begonia/wintering-begonias-overwintering-a-begon

Overwintering Tuberous Begonias Tuberous begonias should be dug up and stored indoors during winter until the return of warmer weather in spring. Pot-grown begonia plants can be stored in their containers as long as they remain dry. They should also be relocated to a protected area that's cool, dark and dry.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/fuchsia/annual-or-perennial-fuchsia.htm

Annual or Perennial Fuchsia In fact, fuchsias are tender perennials. This means that you can grow these plants outside if you live in a very warm climate and they will come back year after year. However, in many chillier climates, gardeners grow fuchsias as annuals, planted outside after all risk of frost is passed.

https://www.longfield-gardens.com/article/Tips-for-Growing-Tuberous-Begonias

A begonia tuber is shaped like a little brown bowl. Sprouts emerge from inside the cupped area and roots form on all sides of the tuber. For best results, encourage the tubers to sprout before planting them in pots or in the garden.

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Any begonias that do not have tubers or rhizomes fall into the third general category of fibrous-rooted varieties. These have ordinary root systems and include many varieties commonly used as summer bedding plants. All begonias with glossy leaves are of this "wax leaf" begonia type.

https://www.thompson-morgan.com/how-many-plants-per-hanging-basket-or-container

A general rule of thumb when planting a hanging basket is to use one plant per inch of basket diameter - so 12 plants per 30cm (12") hanging basket. The only exception to this is when you use strong-growing plants such as Fuchsias and Geraniums (Pelargoniums).

https://todayshomeowner.com/how-to-grow-different-varieties-of-begonias/

Morning sun (and a little afternoon shade) is perfect. Wax begonias can tolerate more sun than other types, and the ones with bronze-colored leaves are the most sun-tolerant of all. Tuberous begonias prefer more shade and less heat, so we often see them on display in late summer. Soil: Light, rich, humusy soil.

https://homeguides.sfgate.com/sizes-begonia-plants-77020.html

Trailing-scandent begonias grow along the ground or vine up tree trunks. They can grow from 6 inches to 8 feet or more. They form roots at the nodes and can spread over large areas. Thick-stemmed begonias develop treelike stems and in warm climates can grow 20 feet tall.

https://extension.umn.edu/flowers/tuberous-begonias

A common way to propagate tuberous begonias is to root cuttings. If you thin out the stems when they are about 3 inches tall, you can use those cuttings. Take a 2- to 3-inch unglazed clay pot and cork the drainage hole in its bottom. Fill a 10-inch plastic pot with vermiculite.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/geranium/how-to-save-geraniums-over-the-winter.h

When saving geraniums for the winter in pots, dig up your geraniums and place them in a pot that can comfortable fit their rootball. Prune the geranium back by one-third. Water the pot thoroughly and place in a cool but well lit part of your house.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/begonia/begonias.htm

Generally, fibrous and rhizomatous begonias make excellent houseplants while tuberous begonias can be grown as houseplants but have a harder time surviving due to the need for higher humidity and light than the other two kinds. Begonias grown indoors are especially susceptible to root rot and overwatering.