Question - Which of the following is a part of a neuron?

Answered by: Carolyn Moore  |  Category: General  |  Last Updated: 22-06-2022  |  Views: 599  |  Total Questions: 14

Neurons (nerve cells) have three parts that carry out the functions of communication and integration: dendrites, axons, and axon terminals. They have a fourth part the cell body or soma, which carries out the basic life processes of neurons. The figure at the right shows a "typical" neuron. Introduction: The brain is made up of about 86 billion nerve cells (also called "neurons"). A neuron has 4 basic parts: the dendrites, the cell body (also called the "soma"), the axon and the axon terminal. Dendrites - Extensions from the neuron cell body that take information to the cell body. The neuron is the basic working unit of the brain, a specialized cell designed to transmit information to other nerve cells, muscle, or gland cells. Neurons are cells within the nervous system that transmit information to other nerve cells, muscle, or gland cells. Most neurons have a cell body, an axon, and dendrites. Every neuron consists of a cell body (also called a soma), dendrites and an axon. Axons and dendrites are nerve fibres. Synapse is, infact, a structure that permits the neuron to pass an electrical or chemical signal to another neuron, hence, it is not part of the neuron. Myelinated neurons are typically found in the peripheral nerves (sensory and motor neurons), while non-myelinated neurons are found in the brain and spinal cord. Dendrites or nerve endings.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neuron

A typical neuron consists of a cell body (soma), dendrites, and a single axon. The soma is usually compact. The axon and dendrites are filaments that extrude from it.

https://www.wingsforlife.com/en/latest/how-does-a-neuron-work-562/

A neuron (also known as nerve cell) is an electrically excitable cell that takes up, processes and transmits information through electrical and chemical signals. It is one of the basic elements of the nervous system. In order that a human being can react to his environment, neurons transport stimuli.

https://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/what.html

The cell body of a motor neuron is approximately 100 microns (0. 1 millimeter) in diameter and as you now know, the axon is about 1 meter (1, 000 millimeter) in length. So, the axon of a motor neuron is 10, 000 times as long as the cell body is wide.

http://www.indiana.edu/~p1013447/dictionary/neuron.htm

Neurons (nerve cells) have three parts that carry out the functions of communication and integration: dendrites, axons, and axon terminals. They have a fourth part the cell body or soma, which carries out the basic life processes of neurons. The figure at the right shows a "typical" neuron.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/terms/neuron.htm

Neuron. Neurons (also known as neurones, nerve cells and nerve fibers) are electrically excitable cells in the nervous system that function to process and transmit information. In vertebrate animals, neurons are the core components of the brain, spinal cord and peripheral nerves.

https://brainly.in/question/4360500

Neurons are the specialized cells of the nervous system that transmit signals throughout the body. Neurons have long extensions that extend out from the cell body called dendrites and axons. Dendrites are extensions of neuronsthat receive signals and conduct them toward the cell body.

https://www.verywellhealth.com/synapse-anatomy-2795867

In the central nervous system, a synapse is a small gap at the end of a neuron that allows a signal to pass from one neuron to the next. Synapses are found where nerve cells connect with other nerve cells.

https://www.ck12.org/biology/nerve-impulse/lesson/The-Nerve-Impulse-Advanced-BIO-ADV/

An action potential, also called a nerve impulse, is an electrical charge that travels along the membrane of a neuron. It can be generated when a neuron's membrane potential is changed by chemical signals from a nearby cell.

https://www.nature.com/scitable/topicpage/myelin-a-specialized-membrane-for-cell-communication-14367

Much like the insulation around the wires in electrical systems, glial cells form a membraneous sheath surrounding axons called myelin, thereby insulating the axon. This myelination, as it is called, can greatly increase the speed of signals transmitted between neurons (known as action potentials).

http://www.bem.fi/book/05/05.htm

The function of the synapse is to transfer electric activity (information) from one cell to another. The transfer can be from nerve to nerve (neuro-neuro), or nerve to muscle (neuro-myo). The region between the pre- and postsynaptic membrane is very narrow, only 30-50 nm.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glia

Glia, also called glial cells or neuroglia, are non-neuronal cells in the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord) and the peripheral nervous system that do not produce electrical impulses. They maintain homeostasis, form myelin, and provide support and protection for neurons.

https://www.brainhq.com/brain-resources/memory/types-of-memory/implicit-memory/

Procedural memory is the type of implicit memory that enables us to carry out commonly learned tasks without consciously thinking about them. It's our "how to" knowledge. Riding a bike, tying a shoe and washing dishes are all tasks that require procedural memory.