Question - Which of the following is a sign of a detached retina?

Answered by: Judy Morris  |  Category: General  |  Last Updated: 22-06-2022  |  Views: 1047  |  Total Questions: 14

The sudden appearance of many floaters — tiny specks that seem to drift through your field of vision. Flashes of light in one or both eyes (photopsia) Blurred vision. Gradually reduced side (peripheral) vision. But warning signs almost always appear before it occurs or has advanced, such as: The sudden appearance of many floaters — tiny specks that seem to drift through your field of vision. Flashes of light in one or both eyes (photopsia) Blurred vision. Astigmatism is a vision condition that causes blurred vision due to an irregular shape of the cornea (the clear front cover of the eye) or by a curvature of the lens inside the eye. Muscles in the colored part of your eye, called the iris, control your pupil size. In low light, your pupils open up, or dilate, to let in more light. When it's bright, they get smaller, or constrict, to let in less light. Sometimes your pupils can dilate without any change in the light. Tears prevent dryness by coating the surface of the eye, as well as protecting it from external irritants. There are no blood vessels on the surface of the eye, so oxygen and nutrients are transported to the surface cells by tears. Foreign bodies that enter the eye are washed out by tears.

https://www.nei.nih.gov/learn-about-eye-health/eye-conditions-and-diseases/retinal-detachment

There are many causes of retinal detachment, but the most common causes are aging or an eye injury. There are 3 types of retinal detachment: rhematogenous, tractional, and exudative. Each type happens because of a different problem that causes your retina to move away from the back of your eye.

https://www.eyeinstitute.co.nz/about-eyes/a-to-z-of-eyes/conditions/retinal-detachment

When a retinal detachment occurs, it usually results in sudden blindness. Quite often, a detached retina can be preceded by a sudden increase in floaters, and the appearance of flashes in your vision. However, there are other causes for these symptoms too, so there's no need to panic if you do experience them.

https://www.nei.nih.gov/learn-about-eye-health/eye-conditions-and-diseases/retinal-detachment

There are many causes of retinal detachment, but the most common causes are aging or an eye injury. There are 3 types of retinal detachment: rhematogenous, tractional, and exudative. Each type happens because of a different problem that causes your retina to move away from the back of your eye.

https://www.westeyehospital.ro/en/conditions-and-treatment/retinal-detachment

The causes of retinal tears are multiple, and include: after an injury (possibly overlooked by the patient), after a strenuous exercise, after a coughing fit, sneezing, vomiting, constipation. A detached retina causes vitreous gel transformations which, if there is an existingtraction, accentuate the detachment.

https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/conditionsandtreatments/retinal-detachment

Your vision will be blurry – it may take some weeks or even three to six months for your vision to improve. Your eye may water.

https://www.umkelloggeye.org/conditions-treatments/detached-retina-retinal-detachment

A detached retina occurs when the retina is pulled away from its normal position in the back of the eye. The retina sends visual images to the brain through the optic nerve. When detachment occurs, vision is blurred. A detached retina is a serious problem that can cause blindness unless it is treated.

https://www.eyeassociatesoftallahassee.com/eyeassociates_tallahassee/blog/detail/2016/07/25/4-health

What's even more interesting is that going in for your yearly eye exam can detect other physical conditions in addition to eye issues. A retinal detachment can be catastrophic if ignored. An ophthalmologist can take a look at your eye and determine whether there are any tears.

https://www.medicinenet.com/image-collection/retinal_detachment_picture/picture.htm

Picture of Retinal Detachment Once the retina has torn, liquid from the vitreous gel (clear gel that fills most of the inside of the eye) passes through the tear and accumulates behind the retina. The build-up of fluid behind the retina is what separates (detaches) the retina from the back of the eye.

https://www.nvisioncenters.com/conditions/eye-dilation/

It can result in vision loss that is irreversible. Glaucoma: There are different types of glaucoma that result in damage to the optic nerve. Eye pressure getting abnormally high is the typical cause of the damage.

https://www.healthline.com/health/how-long-does-eye-dilation-last

Side effects of dilation include: light sensitivity. blurry vision. trouble focusing on close objects. stinging right after the drops are put in.

https://healthcare.utah.edu/healthfeed/postings/2014/03/030514_moran_eye_dilation.php

A thorough, dilated exam allows your ophthalmologist to do a complete exam of the retina, and that is important to do throughout your life, as several eye diseases and conditions are detected at their earliest stages during a thorough eye exam: Retinal detachment.

https://lifehacker.com/dilate-or-shrink-your-pupils-on-command-5072854

Look in the mirror. Try tensing your stomach in a variety of ways and see if it increases your pupil size. Some people can dilate their pupils in this way, although the underlying mechanism is unidentified. It could be connected to the feeling of "butterflies in your stomach" that you get when you like someone.

https://www.therecoveryvillage.com/drug-addiction/drugs-dilated-pupils/

Drugs that Cause Dilated Pupils These include SSRI antidepressants, amphetamines, MDMA, psilocybin, LSD, ecstasy, cocaine and mescaline. In the case of these drugs, serotonin (a brain chemical affecting mood) agonizes the 5-HT2A receptors in the brain and kicks off dilation.

https://www.allaboutvision.com/conditions/dilated-pupils.htm

Dilated pupils are pupils that are larger than normal in size. The size of your pupils is controlled by muscles in the colored part of your eye (iris) and the amount of light reaching your eyes. In dim lighting, your pupils dilate (get larger) to allow more light in.