Question - Which of the following is a sign that your identity may have been stolen?

Answered by: Gregory Russell  |  Category: General  |  Last Updated: 22-06-2022  |  Views: 888  |  Total Questions: 14

Here are seven of the key warning signs that you're the victim of identity theft: Bills for goods or services you didn't purchase appear on your credit/debit card statements: Don't ignore small charges. Crooks who buy stolen account numbers sometimes do a test with a small purchase. If it's unauthorized, check it out. Clues That Someone Has Stolen Your Information You see withdrawals from your bank account that you can't explain. You don't get your bills or other mail. Merchants refuse your checks. Debt collectors call you about debts that aren't yours. You find unfamiliar accounts or charges on your credit report. at 1-877-IDTHEFT (1-877-438-4338) or go to: www. identitytheft. gov/ To order a copy of your Social Security Administration earnings and benefits statement, or to check whether someone has used your Social Security number to get a job or to avoid paying taxes, visit www. socialsecurity. gov/statement/. To see if your Social Security number is being used by someone else for employment purposes, review your Social Security Statement at www. socialsecurity. gov/myaccount to look for suspicious activity. Finally, you'll want to use additional scrutiny by regularly checking your bank and credit card accounts online. Contact one of the credit reporting agencies' fraud alert departments and place a fraud alert on your credit report. Tell the agency you think your identity has been stolen. One call does it all. Call 1-800-525-6285. Visit www. equifax. com. Call 1-888-397-3742.

https://www.experian.com/blogs/ask-experian/how-long-can-the-effects-of-identity-theft-last/

The effects of identity theft can last anywhere between a few days and several years, depending on the type of theft and how quickly you notice and address it. Identity thieves can gain access to your information in any number of ways.

https://www.lifelock.com/learn-identity-theft-resources-can-your-identity-be-stolen-with-only-a-name

How your name and address can lead to identity theft. This can include details like Social Security number, birthdate, or name and address. Depending on what identity thieves find, they can do things like open new credit accounts, steal from existing accounts or commit other crimes using a fake identity.

https://www.consumer.gov/articles/1015-avoiding-identity-theft

A thief can get your personal information in person or online. Here are some ways thieves might steal someone's identity. steal your mail or garbage to get your account numbers or your Social Security number. trick you into sending personal information in an email.

https://www.noidentitytheft.com/hard-catch-identity-thieves/

Identity thieves almost never get caught In a study done in 2006, “only 1 in 700 identity theft suspects were arrested by federal authorities (0. 14%). ” It's safe to say that identity thieves are far more likely to get away with their crimes.

https://www.usa.gov/identity-theft

Keep these tips in mind to protect yourself from identity theft: Secure your Social Security number (SSN). Don't carry your Social Security card in your wallet. Don't share personal information (birthdate, Social Security number, or bank account number) because someone asks for it.

https://www.tomsguide.com/us/what-to-do-ssn-stolen,news-18742.html

Report the theft of the Social Security number to the IRS at http://www. irs. gov/uac/Identity-Protection. You can also call 1-800-908-4490. That will prevent tax-fraud thieves from filing tax returns in your name — and collecting your tax refund.

https://www.lifelock.com/learn-identity-theft-resources-kinds-of-id-theft-using-social-security-numb

Once someone has your Social Security number, they can essentially become you. They may be able to collect tax refunds, collect benefits and income, commit crimes, make purchases, set up phone numbers and websites, establish residences, and use health insurance—all in your name.

https://www.identitytheft.gov/know-your-rights

You have limited liability for fraudulent debts caused by identity theft. Under most state laws, you're not responsible for any debt incurred on fraudulent new accounts opened in your name without your permission.

https://www.wired.com/brandlab/2018/07/want-know-social-security-number-risk-theres-app/

Social Security Number (SSN) Tracker: CreditWise now tracks the names and addresses associated with credit applications linked to a users' social security number, as reported by Experian, and alerts users when their SSN is used to apply for credit.

https://www.equifax.com/personal/education/identity-theft/what-to-do-if-you-lose-your-social-securit

Here are some steps to take for a lost or stolen Social Security card: 1. Consider placing a fraud alert or a security freeze on your credit reports or locking them. A fraud alert lasts for one year and can be renewed.

http://teipencpa.com/did-you-know-the-last-four-digits-of-your-social-security-number-are-especially

Not only can they open credit in your name, steal your money and government benefits, they can also obtain medical care and tax refunds in your name. Guard your “Final Four. ” Although they are widely used and shared, the last four digits of your SSN are the most important to protect. When asked by others, just say no.

https://www.aarp.org/money/scams-fraud/info-2017/protect-social-security-number.html

When asked by others, just say no. The more your number is out there, the greater the risk of identity theft. Guard the Final Four. Although most widely used and shared, the last four digits are in fact the most important to protect.

https://www.ssa.gov/news/materials/pdfs/2019PhoneScamAlertScripts.pdf

They state there is a problem with your Social Security number or account. They claim there has been suspicious or fraudulent activity and you could be arrested or face other legal action. If you suspect you've been contacted by an SSA scammer call the Social Security Fraud Hotline at 1-800-269-0271.

https://www.credit.com/blog/2019/08/a-scammer-has-my-social-security-number-now-what-108167/

Ask for the person's extension and call the SSA customer service phone line at 1-800-772-1213. Dial the extension, and if you get to the same person, the call is legitimate. If not, it could be a social security scam.