Question - Which of the following is a similarity between obstructive lung disease and restrictive lung disease?

Answered by: Steven Edwards  |  Category: General  |  Last Updated: 22-06-2022  |  Views: 1249  |  Total Questions: 14

Obstructive lung diseases include conditions that make it hard to exhale all the air in the lungs. People with restrictive lung disease have difficulty fully expanding their lungs with air. Obstructive and restrictive lung disease share the same main symptom: shortness of breath with exertion. While both types can cause shortness of breath, obstructive lung diseases (such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder) cause more difficulty with exhaling air, while restrictive lung diseases (such as pulmonary fibrosis) can cause problems by restricting a person's ability to inhale air. It is generally characterized by inflamed and easily collapsible airways, obstruction to airflow, problems exhaling and frequent medical clinic visits and hospitalizations. Types of obstructive lung disease include; asthma, bronchiectasis, bronchitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Restrictive lung diseases make it difficult for the lungs to expand completely, so making it harder for someone to inhale fully. Examples include chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and bronchiectasis. Symptoms of the two groups of diseases are similar, and include: chronic cough. The amount of air people can inhale and how well the lungs can stretch are lower in those with restrictive rather than obstructive lung disease. This is measured with pulmonary function tests. However, it is possible to have both restrictive and obstructive lung diseases at the same time.

https://www.webmd.com/lung/obstructive-and-restrictive-lung-disease

Some conditions causing restrictive lung disease are: Interstitial lung disease, such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Sarcoidosis, an autoimmune disease. Obesity, including obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Scoliosis. Neuromuscular disease, such as muscular dystrophy or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/318905

Medications commonly used to treat restrictive lung diseases include: azathioprine. cyclophosphamide. corticosteroids, usually in an inhaler form. methotrexate. other immunosuppressing and anti inflammatory medications. anti-scarring medications, such as pirfenidone or nintedanib.

https://www.healthline.com/health/copd

There's no cure for COPD, but treatment can help ease symptoms, lower the chance of complications, and generally improve quality of life. Medications, supplemental oxygen therapy, and surgery are some forms of treatment.

https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2014/11/the-lung-can-regenerate/

The Lung Can Regenerate. Nevertheless, there are examples in humans that point to the existence of a robust system for lung regeneration. Some survivors of acute respiratory distress syndrome, or ARDS, for example, are able to recover near-normal lung function following significant destruction of lung tissue.

https://www.disabilitysecrets.com/topics/disability-breathing-disorders

Those who suffer from chronic lung infections that cause severely limited airflow may be able to get Social Security disability. You may be eligible for Social Security disability if you have bronchiectasis or pneumoconiosis that causes severe fatigue and shortness of breath.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Restrictive_lung_disease

Other names. Restrictive ventilatory defect. Specialty. Pulmonology. Restrictive lung diseases are a category of extrapulmonary, pleural, or parenchymal respiratory diseases that restrict lung expansion, resulting in a decreased lung volume, an increased work of breathing, and inadequate ventilation and/or oxygenation.

The primary cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is cigarette smoking and/or exposure to tobacco smoke. Other causes include air pollution, infectious diseases, and genetic conditions.

https://www.healthline.com/health/copd/asthma

COPD is characterized by decreased airflow over time, as well as inflammation of the tissues that line the airway. Asthma is usually considered a separate respiratory disease, but sometimes it's mistaken for COPD. The two have similar symptoms. These symptoms include chronic coughing, wheezing, and shortness of breath.

https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/301760-treatment

The prognosis for patients with IPF who do not respond to medical therapy is poor. They usually die within 2-3 years. These and other patients with severe functional impairment, oxygen dependency, and a deteriorating course should be listed for lung transplantation.

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/318905.php

Most people with restrictive lung diseases have similar symptoms, including: shortness of breath, especially with exertion. inability to catch their breath or get enough breath. chronic or a long-term cough, usually dry, but sometimes accompanied by white sputum or mucus. weight loss. chest pain. wheezing or gasping breath.

https://mrmjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s40248-016-0066-z

Obesity causes mechanical compression of the diaphragm, lungs, and chest cavity, which can lead to restrictive pulmonary damage. Furthermore, excess fat decreases total respiratory system compliance, increases pulmonary resistance, and reduces respiratory muscle strength.

https://www.medicine.mcgill.ca/physio/vlab/Other_exps/resp/Lungdiseases_n.htm

Common causes of decreased lung compliance are pulmonary fibrosis, pneumonia and pulmonary edema. In an obstructive lung disease, airway obstruction causes an increase in resistance. Common obstructive diseases include asthma, bronchitis, and emphysema.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2650603/

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an epidemic in many parts of the world. Most patients with COPD demonstrate mild disease. The cornerstone of management of mild disease is smoking cessation, which is the only proven intervention to relieve symptoms, modify its natural history and reduce mortality.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK541029/

Introduction. Lung capacity or total lung capacity (TLC) is the volume of air in the lungs upon the maximum effort of inspiration. Among healthy adults, the average lung capacity is about 6 liters.