Question - Which of the following is a symptom of osteoporosis?

Answered by: Roger Peterson  |  Category: General  |  Last Updated: 22-06-2022  |  Views: 629  |  Total Questions: 14

But once your bones have been weakened by osteoporosis, you might have signs and symptoms that include: Back pain, caused by a fractured or collapsed vertebra. Loss of height over time. A stooped posture. The leading cause of osteoporosis is a lack of certain hormones, particularly estrogen in women and androgen in men. Women, especially those older than 60 years of age, are frequently diagnosed with the disease. Menopause is accompanied by lower estrogen levels and increases a woman's risk for osteoporosis. Osteoporosis, or porous bone, is a disease characterized by low bone mass and structural deterioration of bone tissue, leading to bone fragility and an increased risk of fractures of the hip, spine, and wrist. Men as well as women are affected by osteoporosis, a disease that can be prevented and treated. Osteoporosis is a bone disease that occurs when the body loses too much bone, makes too little bone, or both. When osteoporosis occurs, the holes and spaces in the honeycomb are much larger than in healthy bone. Osteoporotic bones have lost density or mass and contain abnormal tissue structure. The T-score Level Definition Normal Bone density is within 1 SD (+1 or −1) of the young adult mean. Low bone mass Bone density is between 1 and 2. 5 SD below the young adult mean (−1 to −2. 5 SD). Osteoporosis Bone density is 2. 5 SD or more below the young adult mean (−2. 5 SD or lower).

https://www.webmd.com/osteoporosis/features/diet-dangers

There's a good chance the majority of it comes from salt, so the lower the sodium, the better for bones. If you think you can't lower your salt sufficiently, eat plenty of potassium-rich foods, such as bananas, tomatoes, and orange juice. Potassium may help decrease the loss of calcium.

https://www.northwell.edu/orthopaedic-institute/news/how-to-reverse-bone-loss

A decrease in bone density is a natural part of aging, but healthy living can slow down and even reverse bone loss. This may lead to osteopenia or osteoporosis — low bone density and bone weakness. Both conditions increase your risk of falls and fractures.

https://www.healthline.com/health/osteoporosis-myths

Osteoporosis is a serious and sometimes fatal condition. Osteoporosis leads to hip fractures and, according to Sellmeyer, around 25 percent of people die within the first six to 12 months after a hip fracture.

https://www.emedicinehealth.com/osteoporosis_faqs/article_em.htm

For women, bone loss is fastest in the first few years after menopause, but it continues gradually into the postmenopausal years. As bone density loss occurs, osteoporosis can develop. This process is slower by 10 years in men.

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2001/apr/12/healthandwellbeing.health1

Osteoporosis is a serial killer. It affects one in three women and one in 12 men - and kills more women than all gynaecological cancers put together. One in six women taken to hospital with a hip fracture, will not come out alive and men fare even worse.

https://www.nof.org/pagets-symptoms/

Possible complications include: Fractures and deformities. Affected bones break more easily. Osteoarthritis. Misshapen bones can increase the amount of stress on nearby joints, which can cause osteoarthritis. Heart failure. Bone cancer.

https://www.womenshealth.gov/a-z-topics/osteoporosis

Osteoporosis that is not treated can lead to serious bone breaks (fractures), especially in the hip and spine. Hip fractures can cause serious pain and disability and require surgery. Spinal fractures can cause you to lose height or get a stooped back. They often cause serious pain and require surgery.

https://www.deltadentalwa.com/blog/entry/2018/04/osteoporosis-and-oral-health

The jawbone supports and anchors our teeth. Osteoporosis can cause our jawbones to lose density, increasing our risk of fracture and permanent tooth loss. Low bone density can also cause issues how well your dentures fit and you may certain treatments more difficult.

https://www.webmd.com/osteoporosis/features/exercise-for-osteoporosis

Weight-bearing Exercise for Osteoporosis That's because you are being held up by something other than your feet and legs, such as the bicycle or the water. Walking as little as three to five miles a week can help build your bone health.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18778564

The systems affected, the musculo-skeletal system and the central nervous system, are shared in many respects with the frailty syndrome. Vitamin D deficiency is a major contributor to the frailty syndrome, osteoporosis, and osteoporotic fractures.

https://www.hormone.org/diseases-and-conditions/osteoporosis/medicine-induced-bone-loss

High doses or long-term use of medicines called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) can raise the risk of bone loss. PPIs, such as esomeprazole, lansoprazole, and omeprazole, are used for GERD (acid reflux), peptic ulcer, or heartburn. However, getting enough calcium and vitamin D may be enough to lower the risk.

https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/osteoporosis

Healthy lifestyle choices such as proper diet, exercise, and medications can help prevent further bone loss and reduce the risk of fractures. But, lifestyle changes may not be enough if you have lost a lot of bone density. Some will slow your bone loss, and others can help rebuild bone.

https://www.radiologyinfo.org/en/info.cfm?pg=osteoporosis

To diagnose osteoporosis and assess your risk of fracture and determine your need for treatment, your doctor will most likely order a bone density scan. This exam is used to measure bone mineral density (BMD). It is most commonly performed using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA or DEXA) or bone densitometry.

https://www.iofbonehealth.org/impact-osteoporosis

Fractures due to osteoporosis have a serious impact on a person's health, happiness and quality of life. They can result in chronic pain, long-term disability and death. As our life expectancy increases, so too does the proportion of the population suffering osteoporotic fractures.